how to generate barcode c# code Locale-aware Formatting in Objective-C

Painting Data Matrix ECC200 in Objective-C Locale-aware Formatting

Locale-aware Formatting
ECC200 Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Printer In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Different languages and countries have more differences than just their words. They also use different conventions for displaying dates (such as 5/30/10 or 30/5/10), numbers
Generate Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create UPC A In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Download at
Make Code 128C In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create Code 128 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 10: Porting Your App
EAN-13 Drawer In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating GTIN - 8 In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPhone Control to generate, create UPC - 8 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
(such as 13,500.42 or 13.500,42), plural forms, and subject-verb-object placement. If your app programmatically generates such text, translating words will not suffice when localizing to a new country. Java ME has traditionally lacked good support for such localization, forcing developers to create their own solutions or build custom versions of their apps for each locale. More recently, JSR 238 with the javax.microedition.global package has begun to offer a more standard way to treat some of these tasks. However, BlackBerry has included many familiar classes from Java SE and Java EE that provide powerful and fairly simple tools for flexible localization. These classes, which were originally located in java.text or java.util, can all be found in net.rim.device.api.i18n. Some of the most useful are listed below. SimpleDateFormat lets you format and parse an abstract time representation, provided by Calendar, into a natural style for a given locale. Despite the name, it is very flexible, offering strings of varying length (such as 6/10/10 as opposed to June 10th, 2010 ) and structure (such as 15:00 as opposed to 3 o clock PM ). MessageFormat allows you to define flexible string constructions that can be dynamically built with varying data at a later time. For example, a MessageFormat for a particular locale might have the pattern Only {0} more shopping {1} until Guy Fawkes Day! You could then format this pattern with the variables 1 and day , or with 10 and days . In another language, the order of the words would likely change, but the appropriate variables would be inserted into the {0} and {1} fields.
ECC200 Drawer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix Recognizer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Dynamic Localization
Draw Code 128B In .NET
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Scanner In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
In almost all cases, your app should use the current device locale setting. However, certain apps might allow the user to choose their own locale. For example, a city travel guide might include an option to switch languages so you could hand your phone to a native speaker and have them pick out a restaurant for you. Switching locales within the app can also make it easier to test the display of different languages without needing to exit the app and switch device languages. To change the locale, retrieve the Locale you want to use, and then pass it to setDefault(). Locales can be retrieved by name or from an enumeration. The two examples below are equivalent.
Code 39 Recognizer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Locale.setDefault(Locale.get("cs")); Locale.setDefault(Locale.get(Locale.LOCALE_cs));
Barcode Drawer In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing EAN 13 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create EAN13 image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Porting Impact
GS1 128 Reader In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generation In None
Using Barcode printer for Word Control to generate, create Barcode image in Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You should think early on about whether your app will require localization. If you re confident that its use will be so narrow that localization is unnecessary, ignore it. Otherwise, the earlier you start addressing localization, the more easily it will go.
Creating GTIN - 12 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF-417 2d Barcode Generator In Java
Using Barcode maker for BIRT reports Control to generate, create PDF417 image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Download at
CHAPTER 10: Porting Your App
If you are working from a specification, you might know before you start coding exactly what text will be used by the app. This is the best situation to be in: you can define all your strings even before you start writing code, inserting the keys in the app as you write it. If you don t know the text up front, create a blank resource bundle at the start of your project. As you write your app, create keys for any user-visible text you create. Provide a default translation in your native language; don t worry about other languages for now. Once the app is done, you can pass off the keys to a translator to get the necessary translations. More likely, your app will initially be released with only your native language supported, but, once you have demand from other countries or languages, you ll be able to meet their needs almost instantly. In practice, most programs (including MediaGrabber) start off with hard-coded String literals. Towards the end of the project, or even after release, someone will go through the source code to find all visible text and convert it to using resource bundles. This approach requires the greatest total effort, but it does mean that the initial stages of the project can be more legible than they would be with resource keys. While designing the visual look of your app, keep localization needs in mind. The length of text will probably change drastically depending on the language used; going from English to German will greatly increase the text length, while going from English to Japanese may shrink it. As such, text might flow to multiple lines or be cut off. Design your UI flexibly so you can accommodate these changes. Avoid including text within your images: for example, don t include the word Stop in a stop-sign graphic. Doing this would force you to create a new image for every language, which takes up much more space than creating new text. Instead, consider creating blank versions of your images, and then drawing text on top of the images at run-time. Even better, pick images that are self-explanatory, or place labels outside the image. Try to be culturally sensitive. Images, sounds, and phrases that are innocent or funny in one culture might be very offensive in another. Avoid using casual speech, idiomatic phrases, and dialect. This doesn t mean that your app shouldn t have personality, but, if your app uses language too narrowly, it won t make a good impression on foreign users.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.