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Locking of data elements, where applicable Definition of transactional boundaries to facilitate commit and rollback
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In LCDS, the data management module takes care of these complicated scenarios, but in most other cases you need to take care of this yourself.
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Extending Data Services for Advanced Remoting Use Cases
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You have seen the basics of remoting to simple Java classes, which a few years back were given the interesting name of Plain Old Java Objects (POJOs). Now let s look at a couple of advanced use cases.
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Supporting Additional Data Types
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Although AS3 and Java are strikingly similar in programming style, static type system, and syntax, the mapping between AS3 and Java objects is far from optimal. One of the key reasons for this is the lack of AS3 parallels for many Java data types, a glaring example of which can be seen in the two languages collection types. Java has many advanced collection data types, whereas AS3 has very few. For example, there is no equivalent of a SortedSet in AS3. Even if such data types were added to AS3, how could they be mapped to the existing Java data types There is no way of translating automatically between the two. For instance, a strongly typed enumerated type can be created in AS3 to resemble a Java 5 Enum, but it s by no means easy to ensure that serialization and deserialization happen between the two smoothly. Adding support for additional data types is possible but not trivial. In order to understand the path to this addition, it s important to understand the PropertyProxy interface. PropertyProxy in the flex.messaging.io package allows customized serialization and deserialization of complex objects. It has access to each of the steps in the serialization and the deserialization process. During serialization, a PropertyProxy is asked to provide the class name, its properties, and its peculiarities. During deserialization, a PropertyProxy instantiates an object instance and sets the property values. PropertyProxy is a higher-order interface that has been implemented for many different data types In the BlazeDS Javadocs, you will see the following classes implementing the PropertyProxy interface:
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AbstractProxy BeanProxy DictionaryProxy MapProxy PageableRowSetProxy SerializationProxy StatusInfoProxy ThrowableProxy
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When adding support for a specific new data type, you could start by either implementing the PropertyProxy for that type or extending one of its available implementations.
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Data services (both LCDS and BlazeDS) can load and instantiate simple Java classes without a problem. However, they don t work without modification if the remote object is a managed object like an EJB or a Spring bean. This is only natural, because these data services cannot automatically instantiate these
INTEGRATING VIA DATA SERVICES
objects. Managed objects are instantiated, maintained, and garbage collected within the managed environment or container they reside in. If these objects need to be consumed within data services, they warrant a factory mechanism, which can get hold of a managed object instance and make it accessible within a data service namespace. The custom factory varies depending on how the managed object is accessed. Both LCDS and BlazeDS include a so-called factory mechanism to include objects that reside in other namespaces. Theoretically, the idea is simple and goes like this: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Implement a common interface, which defines a method to create a factory. Configure this factory creator so that it can be instantiated and used when needed. Pass the name of this configured factory creator to a destination (which points to the managed object), so that it knows which factory to use to get hold of an object instance. Use the factory to look up an instance of the managed object. Though called a factory, this factory is not really creating anything. It s looking up an instance from a different namespace. Use the object as you would use any other simple Java class. In other words, once bound to a destination and configured, it is ready for RPC.
Practically, most work goes into implementing the lookup method. Start with a custom class and have that custom class implement the FlexFactory interface. Implement the three most important methods, namely
initialize: To get the factory instance configured and ready. createFactoryInstance: To create a FactoryInstance lookup: To return a handle of the object the factory is meant to get hold of
Then configure the factory in services-config.xml like this:
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