generate barcode in c# windows application Controlling the AI car in Font

Encoding Code 128C in Font Controlling the AI car

Controlling the AI car
Generate Code 128 Code Set C In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When you run the example SWF, you ll notice that the AI car also gets stuck in the grass quite often when it doesn t quite make the track corners. This is nice feature that makes the AI car seem like it s being driven by a human player. The code that slows it down in the grass is identical to the code that slows down the player s car. if(_raceTrackMap [_aiCarTileModel.mapRow][_aiCarTileModel.mapColumn] == GRASS) { _aiCarTileModel.friction = 0.85; } else { _aiCarTileModel.friction = 0.98; } The single biggest thing that affects the behavior of the AI car is the value that you assign for its rotationSpeed. In the code we looked at earlier, this value was -2 to make the car turn left and 2 to make it turn right. Here s the section of code that does this: if(difference > 0 && difference < 180) { //Turn left _aiCarTileModel.rotationSpeed = -2; }
Draw QR Code JIS X 0510 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC-A Drawer In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
TILE-BASED GAME DESIGN
Create UCC.EAN - 128 In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128A Creator In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
else { //Turn right _aiCarTileModel.rotationSpeed = 2; } You can give the AI car a radically different driving style by changing these values. If you set rotationSpeed to -5 and 5, the AI car will drive with extreme precision. If you set it to -1 and 1, it will run into the grass with alarming frequency. Here are some ways you could expand this example to a more fully developed racing game: Make a variety of AI cars at different skill levels just by varying the rotationSpeed number. Randomize the rotationSpeed value within a certain range to produce very organic and unpredictable driving styles. Have different AI cars using different angle maps to vary the difficulty. Make some cars fast and give them precise angle maps. Make other cars slower and give them maps that are less accurate. Analyze how well human players did after each race, and make the game more or less difficult to keep it challenging and unpredictable. You ll surely find countless more solutions to tricky problems once you start thinking about storing and using game data in this way.
Drawing PDF417 In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
International Standard Book Number Generation In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create International Standard Book Number image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Collision maps
Make Code 128C In None
Using Barcode printer for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Office Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Making Code 128 In C#
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code-128 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
All the tile-based collisions in the examples so far have involved collisions with stationary objects. Although the enemy and elevator in the platform examples were moving, the collision detection between them and the cat didn t depend on knowing where they were on the maps. The examples used ordinarily distance-based collision detection, which was covered in the first few chapters of this book. Yes, I sort of cheated! Why did I used distance-based collision on those moving objects, while at the same time I used spatial grid collision on the stationary platforms, like the doors and stars To use spatial grid collision detection on a moving game object requires updating the _gameObject map array each time the object moves. If the object enters a new map cell, the array must be updated to match it. I m going to show you how to do that next, using a collision map. A collision map is a two-dimensional array that matches the game world maps, but tracks the locations of moving objects.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Generation In Java
Using Barcode maker for Android Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scanning Barcode In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for BIRT Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Plain-vanilla, distance-based collision is often the best method to use for moving objects, even for tile-based games. If you re checking for collisions with a relatively small number of objects, it s fast and simple. For small-scale games with a static game environment, it s the method of choice. But sometimes distance-based collision just won t cut it. Here are the two big scenarios where a different collision strategy makes sense: A changing game environment: All the platforms in the earlier examples were stationary. But what if you want to create a game where the platforms change interactively over the course of the game The platform map array would need to be changed dynamically to match these new platform positions. This would also be the case if, instead of an action game, you were making a board game, like checkers. The map (game board) would need to be updated with new piece locations each time a player made a move. As you ve seen in previous examples, if you know where different kinds of tiles are in relation to others in your game world, you can make intelligent decisions about what to do with them. In the next chapter, you ll see a practical example of this when we look at pathfinding. Many moving objects: With a lot of objects, distance-based collision starts to become inefficient because you re checking for collisions between objects that have no hope of ever colliding. You can cut down on a lot of unnecessary work by just checking for collisions between objects that are close to one another. This is an extra broad-phase check. How many moving objects is enough to justify implementing this extra step The unscientific rule of thumb is more than 100, which is about the point where Flash Player 10 starts to slow down. You wouldn t want to use an additional broad-phase check with fewer objects because there can be quite a bit of overhead associated with updating and maintaining a dynamic array. Let s look at how to implement a dynamic spatial grid to do tile-based collision checks on moving objects.
Print UCC - 12 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generation In Java
Using Barcode creation for BIRT reports Control to generate, create Barcode image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Reading UPCA In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Creator In None
Using Barcode printer for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Office Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate UCC-128 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128B Printer In Java
Using Barcode generator for BIRT reports Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128 Code Set B Printer In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.