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If the Model class wants to use this interface, it needs to say this in its class definition by using the implements keyword. public class Model extends EventDispatcher implements IModel { Now the model must use the methods in the interface it s signed a contract. The controller also uses an interface called IController. package mvc { import flash.events.KeyboardEvent; public interface IController { function processKeyPress(event:KeyboardEvent):void } } The controller can now implement the IController interface. public class Controller implements IController { The view can now type both the model to IModel and the controller to IController. public function View(model:IModel, controller:IController):void { Does this seem like a lot of extra code to produce something completely insignificant Here s why using interfaces is actually very useful: The view knows that any object that implements IModel or IController will work. It means that the model is guaranteed to dispatch the CHANGE event that it depends on, and that the methods it calls in the controller actually exist. Without these formal guarantees, the program will generate reams of error message if you accidentally pass the view the wrong type of objects. Or worse, the code could simply fail silently, and you ll never know except for strange bugs that might be extremely difficult to track down. It means that you can create other models or controllers that also implement these interfaces, and they ll be guaranteed to work with your existing views. This keeps your code completely modular, and means you can mix and match without the danger of breaking anything. This is a lot to absorb! My suggestion is that you don t use interfaces while doing your own first experiments with the MVC framework. You have enough on your plate to worry about. Good programming practice suggests that you should always use interfaces with MVC, but don t worry, I ll turn a blind eye! I certainly haven t used them in the game examples in this book.
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When you feel confident using the MVC framework, come back to this section in the chapter and try to rework your code using interfaces. It may seem like a bit of overkill now, but it s essential for bug-proofing your code in large projects.
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Have you ever started what you thought was a simple game project and realized after a few days of working on it that it was actually monstrously complex Well, it turns out that monstrous complexity is what game designers refer to as normal complexity. By their very nature, gamedesign projects are among the most complex things that programmers can attempt. In this chapter, we ve tamed this monster somewhat by implementing the MVC framework and a reliable Verlet integration physics system. Some of the later examples in this chapter had very complex code, but as you can see, their structure makes them predictable, self-managing, easy to read, and easy to extend. We now have a rock-solid foundation on which to build the rest of the projects in this book. And you can start using the techniques we looked at immediately in your own projects. You might be surprised by how pleasantly bug-free your code becomes when you start implementing the MVC pattern and Verlet integration. In the next chapter, we re going solve the mystery of collision detection once and for all with a detailed introduction to Euclidean vectors. You ll never need to blindly copy/paste your collision code from a dubious website again!
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You may not know it, but there s an unseen world of invisible forces at work in your games called vectors. They re what make your objects move and detect collisions, and they help you create simulations of real-world physical objects. Vectors are like the atoms and molecules of the game universe everything is dependent on them, but they re very hard to see with the naked eye. In this chapter, we re going to peel away the veil of this mysterious realm to examine these smallest but most important components of the video game universe. With the help of a bit of easy math, vectors are the key to decoding the entire geometry of the space of your game environment. Learning how to work with them gives you unlimited control over your games. How would you feel if you could control gravity, wind, the trajectory of bullets, and the laws of physics and thermodynamics at will Like a character from the Matrix, you will have that kind power in your own game world. Warning! Vectors are not Vectors! In this chapter, vectors refer to Euclidean vectors used in geometry, not the Vector class. The Vector class is an AS3.0 typed array and is completely unrelated to Euclidean vectors. The term also doesn t refer directly to vector graphics, which are used by Flash to draw shapes, although vectors are the underlying mathematical principles on which vector graphics are based.
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