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APPENDIX B
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Bitter basics
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Client
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doSomething() marshal invocation doSomething()
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Figure B.1
Remote method invocation sequence
CORBA is a platform and language independent predecessor to RMI. An explicit goal of the EJB specification is to support integration by existing architectures. In this spirit, the 2.0 specification mandates that containers support CORBA interfaces to EJB as well as the RMI counterparts. IIOP is the underlying communication protocol used by CORBA. RMI-IIOP combines the compatibility of CORBA with RMI s ease of use. Applications can also use RMI-IIOP for intervendor communications. RMI-IIOP sacrifices some functionality for the sake of interoperability. For example, in RMI you can upcast remote objects directly. In contrast, objects retrieved via RMI-IIOP possibly from a JNDI registry must be upcast using the java.rmi.PortableRemoteObject.narrow()
method. This method adds the necessary Java class definition information lost during the IIOP transmission. Client code in a J2EE environment should always favor the narrow method over the direct upcast to ensure interoperability.
B.2 Crafting enterprise beans
Let s briefly review: The three types of EJB can be used to model your middleware application s parts. Session beans are used for your application s logic. Entity
Crafting enterprise beans
Figure B.2
EJB client interface class diagram
beans represent your application s data. Message-driven beans process asynchronous events. As we mentioned earlier, session beans come in two flavors: stateful and stateless. To access and implement either type of session bean, you must follow that type s unique set of rules. In addition, entity beans have two implementation types relating to the persistence delegation models. A developer must explicitly implement the persistence logic for an entity bean using BMP, while the container automatically handles persistence logic for entity beans using CMP.
B.2.1 Defining the client interfaces
The EJB client (possibly another EJB) invokes bean methods and abstractly controls the bean instance s life cycle via a well-defined set of interfaces. Session and entity beans use a home and client Java interface combination while messagedriven bean clients communicate using JMS. Session and entity bean clients look up the bean s home interface using JNDI. The home interface provides bean clients with a starting point, offering a way to loosely control a bean s life cycle. For example, when a client calls the remove() method for a session bean, the container may actually pool the bean instance for use in a later request, rather than actually making it available for garbage collection. Entity bean clients create, query, and remove instances through the home interface. When a client creates an entity bean, the entity is created in the persistent store. When the client calls the remove() method on an entity bean, the container
APPENDIX B
Bitter basics
deletes the entity s data from the persistent store. The entity bean s home interface also declares a set of finder methods that clients use to query for entity bean instances. The operation of the finder methods compares to that of a SELECT in SQL. The finder method signature follows the findXXX() pattern. Let s return to our trip-scheduling example. Here findByUser() on the booking entity home interface would return the collection of booking entities associated with a given user. At a minimum, the bean provider must declare a findByPrimaryKey() method. Both session and entity beans also have what s often referred to as a client or remote interface your bean client s interface to the actual instance and functionality (figure B.2). Session bean interfaces tend to have service-oriented methods for example, book a trip or post a message. Methods in entity bean interfaces correspond to the elements of the entity bean models. In our booking example, this might be get the trip date or set the booking agent on the booking entity bean. See listings B.1 and B.2 for source code examples of the session and entity bean interfaces, respectively. Message-driven beans do not define a standalone Java interface. Clients invoke message-driven beans indirectly using JMS messages. This, in turn, means that the container keeps complete control over the message-driven bean life cycle.
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