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CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
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Start building Quasimodo s body. As you can see, the motor is laid horizontally with respect to the ground. In Step 2, use an 11-long beam. In Step 3, add the Ultrasonic Sensor that forms the robot head, and then insert the 5-long axles into their places. You must insert one of the 5-long axles in the motor shaft hole.
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Add the first row of gears, the black pins, and then the 3-long beams. Be sure to align the cams correctly, so that they are parallel. To do this, check the gear meshing. The cams will make the leg move in a circle.
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CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
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Rotate the model and place the second row of gears, as you did for the ones already in place. Then add the cams on this side, making sure to place them 180 degrees out of phase; that is, rotated half a turn with respect to the other side ones.
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The robot main body is complete. Skip this step if you are going to use the NXT rechargeable battery pack instead of regular batteries. Build the submodel of this step if you re going to use normal batteries. In fact, the NXT battery pack protrudes one LEGO unit out of the normal NXT profile; to get this extra battery thickness, needed to have the robot walk smoothly, you have to build this offset part.
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Start building the left leg.
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CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Assemble the vertical beams of the leg. The first is 11 holes long; the second is 9 holes long.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
The left leg is completed.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Attach the left leg to the robot body, inserting the gray pins into the cam s free holes.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Start building the right leg.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Assemble the vertical beams of the leg. The first is 9 holes long, and the second is 11 holes long; this is the only difference between the two leg assemblies.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
The right leg is completed.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Turn the model and attach the right leg to the robot. Notice that, if you built the cams correctly, the legs are out of phase one forward, the other backward. Quasimodo should now stand on its own feet.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Here you are building the NXT subassembly that forms the hump.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Put the NXT on the robot s top and attach two hip tendons to the right leg.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Turn the model and attach the other two tendons.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Connect the motor to the NXT output port A with a 35cm (14 inch) long cable.
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Connect the Ultrasonic Sensor NXT input port 4 with a 35cm (14 inch) cable. Try to make the cable pass between the main body beams, as shown.
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A view of the robot s back, showing the sensor cable attachment
CHAPTER 2 QUASIMODO
Here you can see how Quasimodo looks once completed.
Summary
You ve made it through the first chapter with building instructions. You should feel satisfied you ve just built a biped that uses many of the techniques described in 1. This robot is representative of the first category I discussed in this book: interlacing legs bipeds. In addition, I ve also given you the first smattering of NXC programming. Not so scary, is it After learning some more theory in 3, you ll be able to build and program a scale-sized replica of the imperial AT-ST in 4: the All Terrain Scout Transport walker from the Star Wars saga.
CHAPTER
Finite State Machines
ost simple robots don t show much interesting behavior. Usually, a sequential program flow regulates their actions: the robot walks until it sees an obstacle, it backs up and turns, and then starts walking forward again in a loop. What do you do if you desire more interesting behavior How would you give your creature a spark of life, by making it act as if it had its own motivations Finite state machines (FSMs) provide the answers to the preceding questions. FSMs are a software technique that you can use to model simple behavior for robots. I ll briefly discuss these FSMs in theory and then you ll apply your understanding in a practical example. Later in this chapter, I ll show you a general way to implement such FSMs. The NXT Turtle in 6, as well as JohnNXT in 8, use this technique to feature autonomous behaviors. Finally, you ll learn an elegant implementation of a particular kind of FSM decision tables.
Finite State Machines in Brief
Let me introduce a bit of the theory behind FSMs. I promise I ll be brief; however, some definition is needed here for you to understand what you ll put in practice later. A finite state machine or finite state automaton (plural automata) is a model of behavior composed of a finite number of internal states (or simply states), the transitions between these states, the set of events that can occur, and actions performed. The internal state describes the machine s situation, based on past events or actual input signals, thus reflecting the history of what happened from system startup until now. However, in some simple cases, all the things we should know about the machine s past are condensed in just the last state. The state transitions are not physically tangible: when an event occurs in a certain state, the variable that represents the state changes accordingly. When events cause state changes, our particular FSM is called event-driven. The actions the machine performs in its different states determine its visible behavior. Therefore, the most expressive way to represent FSMs is the state diagram, as shown in Figure 3-1.
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