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or the data will not longer be appropriately parsable. All this information is stored in object classes that group the various types of data. Some object classes you may use are organizationalperson or inetorgperson.
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One of the driving factors behind the fast adoption of LDAP standards was the ability to interface LDAP and e-mail systems. Up until the late 1990s, the ability to filter, route, rewrite, and utilize e-mail systems in a large scale (in other words, across multiple systems working as a single entity) was typically based on customizations to the e-mail server (such as sendmail). Hosting e-mail across multiple hosts often required a user to have an e-mail address based on a three- or four-part domain name. That is, if Tom Jackiewicz were to have an account on ISP.COM, and the service provider wanted to utilize multiple servers, his account may be tjackiewicz@HOST4.ISP.COM. Susan Surapruik, using the same service provider, may end up as susan@HOST2.ISP.COM. This created e-mail addresses that were difficult to remember but easy for computers to route across multiple systems. Although tools were often created to better route tjackiewicz and susan (and give them e-mail addresses at just ISP .COM), no accepted methods existed for doing this from one system (or independent entity) to another. Fortunately, LDAP came to the rescue by providing e-mail systems with a repository for e-mail information stemming from the e-mail address, routing methods, final destination, and other e-mail related configuration information. As you can see, e-mail, in the case of LDAP is a story of two sides. As a system administra, tor, you can see that during the processing of an e-mail by a Mail Transfer Agent (MTA), LDAP goes beyond standard Domain Name Service (DNS) based processing of the e-mail. As an end user, you may see that LDAP can be used as a centralized address book to look up other users e-mail addresses (as well as other information). LDAP should be used in both of these ways, even relying on each to share information. You may also encounter X.400 systems. X.400 is the set of standards from International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) that describes a messaging service. The transport of e-mail is the primary application. X.400 exists as X.400/84 and X.400/88, which are standards described in the ITU-TU Red Book and Blue Book. They re named as such because of the years that the standards were created (1984 and 1988, respectively). X.400/84 has been defined to run over a standard Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) stack (X.25, TP0, BAS Session); thus, most implementations, and all that pass conformance tests, are able to run over an X.25 network. If you have an e-mail address in the form of TomJackiewicz@mail.YourCompany.com, realize that this really isn t your true address in an X.400 environment. X.400 uses directory services to create maps between your e-mail address and something that looks remarkably like a distinguished name (DN). For example, the previous e-mail address may map to C=com;ADMD=;PRMD=yourcompany;O=lab;OU=mail;S=Jackiewicz;G=Tom, which is a far cry from what you re accustomed to typing. Other mapping possibilities exist, all of which rely on directory services.
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The primary goal for deploying directory services is, more often than not, the creation of a phone directory within your environment. While the task may not seen difficult to accomplish, creating this environment will often involve gaining access to an old legacy mess of
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information. Phone systems, unlike modern components of your infrastructure, are built so well that they often work for many decades. Where new systems may be modern and have appropriate interfaces for accessing information, you ll probably have to brush up on RSTE/E (an old operating system that s the predecessor to VMS) and a series of dead scripting languages in order to pull information from the telephone database. In many environments, this job is done for you in a number of ways. Unfortunately, this will also create problems, because accessing information away from the direct source often creates data ownership and maintenance issues. The format of the telephone number must also be standardized and maintained. Some companies rely on extensions, and others use the full telephone number. Still others may choose different formats (see Table 1-2). Table 1-2. Phone Formats
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