c# create barcode Figure 3 1. The workstation object in Objective-C

Creation QR Code JIS X 0510 in Objective-C Figure 3 1. The workstation object

Figure 3 1. The workstation object
Drawing Denso QR Bar Code In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
To maintain familiarity with the purpose of this book, I will describe the object using objective-C. First, let s see what the object s interface (what goes into the .h file) might look like.
Making Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
USS Code 39 Printer In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPhone Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 3: EA Framework Design Patterns
Draw QR Code 2d Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create QR-Code image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint DataMatrix In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
@interface WorkStation : NSObject NSString *purpose; NSString *department; BOOL *isOccupied; BOOL *isOperational; BOOL *hasParts; // and more stuff } - (void) - (void) - (void) - (void) @end
GTIN - 128 Printer In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing EAN-8 In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 8 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
stockParts:(id)partType; setOperationMode:(id)modeType addOperator; removeOperator;
QR Code 2d Barcode Reader In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR Code Generation In None
Using Barcode creator for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create QR image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Obviously this code snippet doesn t contain everything needed to define the actual workstation, but it definitely gives an idea of how to connect a real world object with the software environment. First, note that by defining the class of object as WorkStation it is subclassed, or derived, from the general NSObject class. This means that it inherits all the properties and methods of that most general of all classes, but it does not mean that you have to use all of them. In fact, you may hardly use any. Note the capitalization of WorkStation. When you define a class, common practice is to capitalize the first letter and all first letters of each word that you concatenate to form your object name. You will see later, when naming object instances, that you leave the first letter lowercase. Next, within the brackets, define the properties that you want to be made public, that is, which other objects can be seen. For example, you might have a supervisor object that needs to see if the workstation is occupied, if it is running (operational) and if it has parts. The supervisor might not care about purpose or department because it may be that the supervisor is for all power supply operations. Thus the workstation s purpose would be power supply installation and it would be in the power supply installation department. So why include them Suppose there is an object that oversees all manufacturing. That object will need to differentiate workstations by both department and purpose to determine and predict any bottlenecks that might occur. There would likely be plenty more properties listed here. While there is no general rule of thumb as to how many properties to include, try to keep it contained. You don t want pages and pages of properties to have to go through whenever you look at your code. Remember, properties themselves can be objects. Instead of the individual Boolean values:
Making UPC-A Supplement 5 In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPad Control to generate, create UPC A image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code128 Reader In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
BOOL BOOL BOOL *isOccupied; *isOperational; *hasParts;
EAN 128 Recognizer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Matrix Encoder In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Matrix image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You might instead define a status object that contains all three:
ECC200 Reader In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix Recognizer In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
@interface WorkStation : NSObject {
DataMatrix Creation In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Reader In VB.NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 3: EA Framework Design Patterns
QR Code Decoder In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
NSString NSString StatusObject // and more stuff }
*purpose; *department *workstationStatus;
NOTE: You may also use the @private keyword before you declare a variable that you do not want to be public. Some OO programmers use the underscore _ before a variable to indicate that it is private. Apple discourages this practice. After you define the properties of the workstation, you need to know what functions the workstation object is capable of performing. Some items that come to mind are stocking parts into the station, changing modes (assembling, testing, restocking, etc.), and adding or removing an operator to the station. The status of this action will, in turn, define other properties as well as methods that become available or unavailable. For example, unless the workstation has an operator as set by the addOperator method, it wouldn t be able to change to assembling or testing modes as those are likely to need someone to actually do the work. You could go on and on about the example workstation object and all that it encompasses, but that s a discussion for an OOP text. What you want to do is discover how the object-oriented paradigm applies to interfacing iPhone accessories and to the example project. To start with the obvious, the accessory hardware that you are concerned with is an object. It will have properties such as a BOOL isConnected that is either YES or NO depending on, well, whether it is connected or not. Other characteristic properties might be: protocolUsed, sessionEstablished, sessionID, outputStreamID, inputStreamID, etc. You may or may not use these particular properties in your implementation there is no definitive set of methods or properties for any project s object definition. This is all up to the designer. The accessory controller gives you the first is-clearly-an-object object. But what else should you include Is it the screen or maybe the program itself First, think about the overall top-level object. What is it It s your game program. It s not just the iPhone, but the program, the controller, and to some extent, even the player. After all, the player will have properties such as score or isServing, as well as properties such as movePaddle and pressButton. Even the objects within other objects need to be considered here. I talked about the game as a whole, but all the parts of the game playersPaddle, computersPaddle, ballObject, and even bounds need to be addressed. After all, you re going to move the paddles, which will move the balls, and each of those will have positions, and I think you re starting to see it now. In a sentence, every individual component of the system
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.