c# create barcode free The Core Container in Font

Encoding Quick Response Code in Font The Core Container

CHAPTER
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Generator In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create QR image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 39 Extended Generation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The Core Container
Drawing PDF 417 In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
he Spring Framework Core Container is essentially a factory that creates objects without revealing the exact classes that are used and how they are created, as we demonstrated in the previous chapter. In software engineering, factories encapsulate the process of obtaining objects, which is usually more complex than just creating new objects. The Core Container uses encapsulation to hide from the actual application the details of how an application is created and configured; the application doesn t know how to assemble itself or how to bootstrap. Instead, these tasks are handed off to the Core Container by providing the location of one or more configuration files that contain information about each object in the application that must be created. Next, the Core Container needs to be bootstrapped to launch the application. This chapter will cover all the details you need to be familiar with to configure application components and load them with the Core Container. We ll cover the following topics: How factories work in general, to demonstrate the principle of encapsulation. This principle is important, as it s the foundation of the inversion of control (IoC) principle. How the basic container of the Spring Framework is configured. We ll show you how to configure the container to use dependency lookup, dependency injection, setter injection, and constructor injection. How the bean life cycle is managed by the Core Container. Each bean can take advantage of optional configuration hooks provided by the Core Container. Each bean also has a predefined scope inside the Core Container. How to use factory methods and factory objects in the Core Container. This mechanism can be used to move complex object-creation code from the application code into the Core Container. How the XML configuration in version 2.0 of the Core Container has been dramatically simplified for your convenience. We ll show you some new XML tags and how their use compares to the classic XML configuration. How the Core Container can be bootstrapped in different environments. This is an interesting discussion, as we ll be configuring the Spring Framework in servlet containers and in integration tests in later chapters.
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Maker In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code 128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
EAN128 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create EAN 128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
How Do Factories Work
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint Ames Code In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create Monarch image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Factories solve a common problem in software engineering: hiding the complexity of creating and configuring objects. You can use both factory methods and factory objects.
QR Code Encoder In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Quick Response Code Recognizer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 2 THE CORE CONTAINER
PDF417 Drawer In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128 Generator In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Factory Methods
Draw EAN128 In None
Using Barcode generation for Online Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Reading QR Code 2d Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
To demonstrate the benefits of factory methods, let s look at an example. Let s say we want to read a text file line by line. To do so, we need to use the java.io.BufferedReader class. When creating a BufferedReader object, however, we need to write more code than is convenient: BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader( new FileInputStream(new File("myFile.txt")))); Things start to become even more inconvenient if we need to create BufferedReader objects in multiple places in our application. The solution to this problem is to create a factory method that has a java.io.File argument and returns a BufferedReader object: public class ReaderUtils { public static BufferedReader createBufferedReader(File file) throws IOException { return new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file))); } } Now we can call the createBufferedReader() method whenever we need to create a BufferedReader object: BufferedReader reader = ReaderUtils.createBufferedReader(new File("myFile.txt")); By using a factory method, our code becomes more readable, and we ve found a convenient way to hide the creation of a complex object. In fact, if at a later time we discover that it makes more sense to use the java.io.FileReader class, we need to change the code only in the factory method, while the calling code remains unaffected: public class ReaderUtils { public static BufferedReader createBufferedReader(File file) throws IOException { return new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file)); } } Using factory methods avoids the following: Duplicating complex object-creation code Introducing the details of object creation in areas of the application where it doesn t belong The factory method is a classic example of a design pattern a solution to a common problem in software engineering. It encapsulates object-creation code that is of no concern to other parts of the application. Hiding concerns in software engineering to increase flexibility and robustness of a design is called separation of concerns. It s much more efficient to solve a problem with a factory method once and offer this solution through a consistent API than it is to solve the problem every time it presents itself. The factory method is a very popular encapsulation pattern in applications and frameworks, although it has its limits, primarily because static methods cannot hold state.
Recognizing Barcode In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting GTIN - 13 In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Android Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR-Code Drawer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Scanner In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scanning GTIN - 13 In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code128 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.