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Now, let s clear up that scope question of yours.
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Feature Scope
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Features are scoped, meaning you can have a feature activated at the farm, web application, site collection, or site level. When a feature is activated at a scope, it also affects subscopes, so if you use a web application scoped feature to add a custom action somewhere, then every site collection and every site beneath the web application will have the same custom action. It s a bit confusing, perhaps, but when scoping features, the WSS 2 style names are used. That is, site is used for site collections, and web is used for web sites. This is very strange, especially since features were introduced in WSS 3 and didn t even exist in WSS 2. For the sake of being consistent with other information, I will use the WSS 2 names for the scopes, that is, web-scoped, site-scoped, web application scoped, and farm-scoped. The scoping of a feature is important, because scoping defines which types of elements can be deployed with a feature. For instance, content types, to be covered more in 8, make sense only in a site-scoped feature, since content types are stored in the site collection. This does lead to a bit of a challenge when you want to add a web-scoped list template where you add some custom fields, which are site-scoped. One way to solve this is to have two separate features. You can then use feature activation dependencies to make sure the fields are activated before the list template. You ll learn more about that a bit later in the chapter.
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You can find an online table of all feature elements by scope at Tip
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www.understandingsharepoint.com/url/10025. Or just google feature elements by scope.
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Advanced Feature Concepts
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Although features can be as simple as adding a list or a field, features offer far more bang for the buck than any other SharePoint feature. I told you it would be confusing. The following sections contain some slightly more advanced feature topics for your reading pleasure.
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Feature Event Handlers
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Another powerful feature of features is the ability to add event handlers directly to the feature so that you can have code executed when the feature is activated, deactivating, installed, or uninstalling. Note the subtle differences in word stemming. The FeatureActivated event happens asynchronously, while the FeatureDeactivating event is synchronous. The events ending in ed happen after the fact, while the ones ending in ing happen during the fact.
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CHAPTER 3 EXPLORING FEATURE BASICS AND NOT-SO BASICS
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To add an event receiver to your feature, you simply add the ReceiverAssembly and ReceiverClass properties of your receiver to the Feature element in feature.xml as such: <Feature Id="[Create guid]" Title="MyFeature" ReceiverAssembly="[YOUR STRONG NAME HERE]" ReceiverClass="[YOUR CLASS NAME HERE]" Description="My description" Version="12.0.0.0" Hidden="FALSE" Scope="Web" DefaultResourceFile="core" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/">
Your class should inherit from the SPFeatureReceiver base class. When writing your class, you have access to the site, site collection, web application, or farm on which the feature is activated or is deactivating through the properties.Feature.Parent property. This property returns only an object type, however, so you would need to cast the parent to a class matching the respective scope. For a web-scoped feature (remember, that means it is activated on a site in WSS 3 terms), you could write something like this: public override void FeatureActivated(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties) { SPWeb web = (SPWeb)properties.Feature.Parent; } Since you have access to the parent object, you can do virtually anything in the event handler itself, including anything you would normally do in the CAML in the elements.xml file such as creating list instances, adding fields or content types, provisioning pages, and so on. In fact, you can usually do plenty more in a feature event handler than you can with a CAML elements file. For example, you can have a feature create subsites or add SharePoint user groups in code, but not in CAML. Creating custom views, however, is one thing you would probably want to do in CAML rather than in code, especially if you are looking to make your views a bit more complex than the default experience. Feature event handlers are very powerful. As an exercise for yourself, you should try once to do an entire site creation process in code, just to see how the different parts of a site can be created. I will cover the CAML part of site creation in Part 3 of this book and also talk about how you can use code to set up features in a site in 14.
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