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XML Can Be Used to Easily Share Data
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The fact that XML is nothing but textual data ensures that it can be shared among heterogeneous systems. For example, how can a Visual Basic 6 (VB6) application running on a Windows machine talk with a Java application running on a Unix box XML is the answer.
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XML Can Be Used to Create Specialized Vocabularies
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As you already know, XML is an extensible standard. By using XML as a base, you can create your own vocabularies. Wireless Application Protocol (WAP), Wireless Markup Language (WML), and Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) are some examples of specialized XML vocabularies.
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XML-Driven Applications
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Now that you know the features and benefits of XML, let s see what all these benefits mean to modern software systems. Figure 1-1 shows a traditional web-based application. The application consists of Active Server Pages (ASP) scripts hosted on a web server. The client, in the form of a web browser, requests various web pages. On receiving the requests, the web server processes them and sends the response in the form of HTML content. This architecture sounds good at first glance, but suffers from several shortcomings: It considers only web browsers as clients. The response from the web server is always in HTML. That means a desktop-based application may not render this response at all. The data and presentation logic are tightly coupled. If we want to change the presentation of the same data, we need to make considerable changes. Tomorrow, if some other application wants to consume the same data, it cannot be shared easily.
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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCING XML AND THE .NE T FRAM EWORK
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Figure 1-1. Classic architecture for developing applications Now, let s see how XML can come to the rescue in such situations. Have a look at Figure 1-2, where there are multiple types of clients. One is a web browser, and the other is a desktop application. Both send requests to the server in the form of XML data. The server processes the requests and sends the data in XML format. The web browser applies a style sheet (discussed later) to the XML data to render it as HTML content. The desktop application, on the other hand, parses the data by using an XML parser (discussed later) and displays it in a grid. Much more flexible than the previous architecture, isn t it The advantages of the new architecture are as follows: The application has multiple types of clients. It is not tied only to web browsers. There is loose coupling between the client and the processing logic. New types of clients can be added at any time without changing the processing logic on the server. The data and the presentation logic are neatly separated from each other. Web clients have one set of presentation logic, whereas desktop applications have their own presentation logic. Data sharing becomes easy, because the outputted data is in XML format.
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Figure 1-2. XML-driven architecture
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CH APT ER 1 IN TRO D UCI NG X ML A ND T HE .NET F RAME WO RK
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Rules of XML Grammar
In the What is XML section, you saw one example of an XML document. However, I didn t talk about any of the rules that you need to follow while creating it. It s time now to discuss those rules of XML grammar. If you have worked with HTML, you will find that the rules of XML grammar are more strict than the HTML ones. However, this strictness is not a bad thing, because these rules help ensure that there are no errors while we parse, render, or exchange data. Before I present the rules in detail, you need to familiarize yourself with the various parts of an XML document. Observe Figure 1-3 carefully.
Figure 1-3. Parts of a typical XML document Line 1 is called a processing instruction. A processing instruction is intended to supply some information to the application that is processing the XML document. Processing instructions are enclosed in a pair of < and >. The xml processing instruction in Figure 1-3 has two attributes: version and encoding. The current W3C recommendations for XML hold version 1.0, hence the version attribute must be set to 1.0. Line 2 represents a comment. A comment can appear anywhere in an XML document after the xml processing instruction and can span multiple lines. Line 3 contains the document element of the XML document. An XML document has one and only one document element. XML documents are like an inverted tree, and the document element is positioned at the root. Hence, the document element is also called a root element. Each element (whether or not it is the document element) consists of a start tag and end tag. The start tag is <customers>, and the end tag is </customers>. It is worthwhile to point out the difference between three terms: element, node, and tag. When you say element, you are essentially talking about the start tag and the end tag of that element together. When you say tag, you are talking about either the start tag or end tag of the element, depending on the context. When you say node, you are referring to an element and all its inner content, including child elements and text. Inside the <customers> element, you have two <customer> nodes. The <customer> element has one attribute called ID. The attribute value is enclosed in double quotes. The <customer>
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