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Modern applications seldom run on a single machine. They are distributed and span two or more machines. Figure 1-8 shows a simple distributed application spanning three machines. Here, the database and data-access components are located on a separate server. Similarly, business logic components are located on their own server, and the client applications access these components through a network. Imagine that the client wants some data from the database to display to the end user. The data is pulled out from the database from data-access components. But how will it reach the client That is where serialization comes into the picture. Serialization is a process in which data is written to some medium. In the preceding example, the medium is a network but it can be a file or any other stream also. The data-access components will serialize the requested data so that it can reach the client application. The client application then deserializes it that is, it reads from the medium and reconstructs the data in an object or any other data structure. In the case of XML serialization, this data is serialized in the XML format. XML serialization is used extensively by web services. The XmlSerializer class provides a programmatic way to serialize and deserialize your objects.
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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCING XML AND THE .NE T FRAM EWORK
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Figure 1-8. A simple distributed application
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In the previous example, we simply assumed that components residing on different machines talk with each other. But how Remoting is the answer. .NET remoting provides an infrastructure for building distributed applications. Though remoting can be used over the Internet, more commonly it is used when the network involved is a local area network (LAN). For Internetdriven communication, web services are more appropriate (see the next section). You can think of remoting as a replacement for Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) under .NET. It is clear that remote components must serialize and deserialize data being requested by the client applications. This serialization can be in binary format or in XML format. Moreover, the remoting configuration can be carried by using XML-based configuration files.
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With the evolution of the Internet, distributed applications are spanning different geographical locations. You may have one server residing in the United States with clients talking to it from India. It is quite possible that the clients and server are running two entirely different platforms (Windows and Unix, for example). In such cases, it is necessary that a standard mode of communication be established between the server and clients so that communication can take place over the Internet. That is where web services come into the picture.
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CH APT ER 1 IN TRO D UCI NG X ML A ND T HE .NET F RAME WO RK
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Formally speaking, web services are a programmable set of APIs that you can call over a network by using industry-standard protocols: HTTP, XML, and an XML-based protocol called SOAP (as noted earlier in this chapter, SOAP stands for Simple Object Access Protocol). You can think of a web service as a web-callable component. Because a web service is supposed to serve cross-platform environments, it relies heavily on XML. HTTP, XML, and SOAP form the pillars of web services architecture. Web services are industry standards, and just like XML, they are standardized by the W3C and hence have massive industry support. Have a look at Figure 1-8 again. Assume that the three machines involved are connected via the Internet and not a LAN. The components will now be replaced with web services, and they will perform the same jobs as the components did previously. In such cases, the client will call a web service residing on the business logic server, which in turn calls a web service residing on the database server. The requested data is sent back to the client in XML format. It doesn t matter whether the client is a VB6 application, a VB.NET application, or a Java application. Powerful, isn t it You will explore web services thoroughly in later chapters.
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