c# print barcode s IMPROVING YOUR FIRST 2-D GAME in Font

Creating ECC200 in Font s IMPROVING YOUR FIRST 2-D GAME

CHAPTER 4 s IMPROVING YOUR FIRST 2-D GAME
Data Matrix Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code-39 Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The ShowScene() method is just a helper to Show() a new scene and Hide() a previous scene, as follows:
Generating GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding PDF-417 2d Barcode In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
/// <summary> /// Open a new scene /// </summary> /// <param name="scene">Scene to be opened</param> protected void ShowScene(GameScene scene) { activeScene.Hide(); activeScene = scene; scene.Show(); }
Draw Code 128B In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
DataMatrix Generation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
What about the Draw() method Well, all elements of your game are GameComponents now, so just let XNA do its job:
Barcode Generation In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make MSI Plessey In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
/// <summary> /// This is called when the game should draw itself. /// </summary> /// <param name="gameTime">Provides a snapshot of timing values.</param> protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime) { // Begin.. spriteBatch.Begin(); // Draw all GameComponents.. base.Draw(gameTime); // End. spriteBatch.End(); }
ECC200 Generation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Online Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating Data Matrix ECC200 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
That s it. Compile and execute the game to see the final result. The architecture is flexible, and it s easy to add new features to your game, as you ll see in the next chapter. However, try putting new meteor types or new ways to acquire energy, for instance. You ll start to understand how games are assembled from GameComponents.
Creating EAN13 In Java
Using Barcode encoder for BIRT reports Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode creator for Word Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 4 s IMPROVING YOUR FIRST 2-D GAME
QR-Code Generation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognize UPC A In VB.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Summary
Generating UPC-A Supplement 5 In None
Using Barcode printer for Office Word Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF-417 2d Barcode Recognizer In VB.NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You started from a simple game and evolved that into a more elaborate game with simple techniques that are useful to any kind of game. You saw the value of the GameComponents and their reuse capability. Feel free to improve and change this game and build your own awesome version of Rock Rain!
Encoding EAN-13 Supplement 5 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode Barcode In C#
Using Barcode generator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER
Barcode Reader In .NET Framework
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding UPC A In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Basics of Game Networking
n this chapter you ll see basic concepts involved in creating games that support networking, so you ll be prepared to create a real multiplayer game in the next chapter.
Introducing Multiplayer Games
Online multiplayer games, also known as network-enabled games or simply networked games, are hard to code. Period. That said, it s also important to state that, in XNA, this difficulty is not related to coding for connecting the machines (PCs or Xbox 360) or making them talk with each other. That s because XNA hides all complexities from you in this case, as it does with everything else in the framework. Networked games are hard to code because there are many extra problems to deal with: your program will receive messages from the host or other players, send messages back to them, process the local player input, and perform the physics and artificial intelligence calculations, while not letting the screen freeze between each frame drawn (one of the worst things that might happen in a multiplayer game). Fortunately, XNA can help us with most of the communication problems, such as providing ways to control the message flow between players and host to guarantee that no message is lost and that all messages arrive in the same order they were sent, if you want to. Nevertheless, there will still be some problems to solve. Before discussing the details of XNA support for networking, let s look at some basic concepts about networked games and some of the most common problems faced when coding such games, in the next sections.
Choosing the Network Topology
The most common topologies for networked games are peer-to-peer and client/server connections, and because XNA network implementation is not tied to any type of connection, you can code any of these types depending on the way you organize your network code.
CHAPTER 5 s BASICS OF GAME NETWORKING
In peer-to-peer connections, every player is aware of every other player in the game, sending and receiving messages from, and to, all players, as illustrated in Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-1. Peer-to-peer connection
The most obvious benefit of using this network organization is that you don t need a dedicated server to play the game, so every group of players can play it within their own local area network (LAN), or even through the Internet, as long as they know the addresses of the other members of the group. In this type of connection, one of the players acts as a host, so all the new players connect to that player. However, once connected, the messages flow directly from one player to all the others. If the player who is also the host disconnects from the game, the game might stop or simply choose another player as the new host, depending on what the game developers defined. The main problem you face when coding peer-to-peer games is that you can t have too many players in the same game session, because the number of messages will increase exponentially with every new player who joins. For instance, in Figure 5-1 we have 4 players, so every time a player needs to update his or her status (for example, move), you send 3 messages, one for each player. Because you have 4 players, during each game turn you exchange 4 ! 3 = 12 messages. Making the same calculations with a 5-player game increases this to 5 ! 4 = 20 messages per turn, and in a 6-player game you ll reach 6 ! 5 = 30 messages. Usually, having more than ten players in the same game session is not suggested, because every message can take dozens of bytes and you ll consume the bandwidth available in your network quickly. But it s still possible if the game development team can make the messages as small as possible; for example, passing only the players inputs across the computers, and letting games on every player s machine calculate everything else from these inputs. The second most common game network topology is client/server. In this kind of network, all players connect to a host, which usually processes the messages and does
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.