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Let s take a look at what happens when a Ubuntu-equipped PC boots. Then we ll explore some ways to speed up the process.
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Understanding Bootup
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When you start your computer, initially, the computer s BIOS searches for a boot program on the hard disk. In the case of Ubuntu, the boot program runs the GRUB boot loader. If you ve installed Ubuntu alongside Windows (or any other operating system), the GRUB menu will appear at this stage, and you ll be able to choose which operating system to load. If only Ubuntu is on the hard disk, you ll see a brief prompt for three seconds telling you that the GRUB menu will appear if you press a key. However your system is set up, GRUB has the same fundamental function: it s designed to load the Linux kernel. The kernel then starts the very first program that s run on any Linux system: init. The principal job of init is to run a variety of run-level scripts, which load the hardware and software necessary for the full and correct functioning of the system. Two sets of run-level scripts run at this time: system initialization scripts, which are contained in /etc/rcS.d, and numbered run-level scripts, which are found in /etc/rcX.d (where X is the number of the current run level).
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CHAPTER 31 OPTIMIZING YOUR SYSTEM
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Note Actually, the /etc/rc directories don t contain the scripts. They merely contain symbolic links to
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scripts, which are contained in /etc/init.d.
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The initialization scripts take care of the basics of the system, ensuring that vital hardware and software services are started. Initialization scripts are considered critical in order for the system to run correctly. Numbered run-level scripts are more optional. They provide services the user may or may not need, depending on how the computer will be used. For example, a numbered run-level script might start the printing service. Another numbered run-level script might start the GUI components. Some users may not need either of these, so they could be removed. Ubuntu has seven groups of numbered run-level scripts, ranging from 0 through 6. Each defines the mode in which the computer is running. For example, run level 1 is single-user mode. This means that only one user can log in, and networking is disabled (usually, many other nonessential services are not activated either).
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Note Run level 6 is reboot mode and exists simply to reboot the system, while run level 0 is halt mode and
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will shut down the system. You ll probably never come into direct contact with these run levels. Instead the programs you use to shut down or restart the system, such as the System Log Out option within GNOME, use these run levels.
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On Ubuntu, run levels 2 through 5 are defined as multiuser. Technically speaking, this means that they allow more than one user to log on, but actually, they re the day-to-day running modes of the computer. Run level 2 is the default run level under Ubuntu and, just as the system initialization scripts are contained in /etc/rcS.d, run level 2 scripts are contained in /etc/rc2.d, as shown in Figure 31-1.
Note In fact, Ubuntu s run levels 2 through 5 are identical. Run levels 3 through 5 might be described as spares, existing merely for further expansion possibilities. For what it s worth, it s theoretically possible to utilize run levels 7, 8, and 9, but few people do so because 2 through 5 offer more than most users need.
You might think that once the run-level scripts have completed, the system is ready to be used. But that s not the case. Although you ll be able to log on when the run-level scripts have finished, the GNOME desktop has yet to start, and this, too, has its own set of initialization processes. It needs to start its own set of programs, such as notification area applets, which provide handy functions like on-screen volume control.
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