vb.net barcode component Working in the Computer Window in Java

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Working in the Computer Window
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In the Places Computer window, you ll find icons for all of the storage devices attached to your computer, including the floppy disk drive, as shown in Figure 12-10. However, because of the way floppy disk drives work, Ubuntu isn t able to automatically detect if a floppy has been inserted. Instead, you ll need to double-click the icon, as with Windows.
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Note In days of old, special tools were used to access MS-DOS floppies under Linux, and you might hear
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some Linux old-hands talking about them. Nowadays, you can simply use Nautilus without needing to take any special steps.
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Whenever you double-click any entry in the Computer window, it will open a Nautilus file browser window. You can copy files by clicking and dragging, and right-clicking files offers virtually all the options you could need.
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Tip You don t need to use Places Computer each time to access your floppy, CD, or DVD drive. These drives
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are mounted in the /media folder on your hard disk. Just browse to /media/floppy, and /media/cdrom.
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CHAPTER 12 MA NA GIN G YOUR FILES
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Figure 12-10. Select Places Computer to access your removable storage drives.
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Ejecting Media
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Ubuntu isn t quite like Windows when it comes to ejecting or unplugging removable storage devices. In some cases, devices must be unmounted, which is to say that you need to tell Ubuntu that you re finished with the device in question and that you re about to unplug it. In the case of CD or DVD discs, you can simply press the Eject button on the drive itself. Ubuntu is able to detect that the disc is being ejected, so it will automatically unmount the drive. If the disc ever refuses to eject, right-click its icon on the desktop or within Computer and select Eject. In the case of floppy disks, USB memory sticks, and other USB storage devices, you should always right-click the icon and select Unmount Volume. Then you can unplug or remove the device. This also applies when you re removing a memory card from a card reader before pulling out the card from the reader, it needs to be unmounted.
Note It s necessary to close any files that were open on the device before unmounting, and even close
any file browser windows that were accessing the device.
CHAPTER 12 MA NA GING YOUR FILES
If you fail to unmount the device, Ubuntu will still believe the device is attached. This shouldn t cause too many problems, but it could crash any programs that were accessing the device. It might also mean the card isn t recognized properly when you reinsert it. In rare instances, data loss can occur.
Summary
This chapter has led you on your first steps in exploring the Linux file system. The file system is vitally important to how Linux works, and we ll go into it in much depth in upcoming chapters. Here, you were introduced to elementary concepts, such as where personal files are stored and the basic rules that govern what you can and cannot do with files. We also looked at the principal method of accessing files via the GUI: the Nautilus file manager. Additionally, you learned how to run programs manually, as well as how to access any Windows partition or files that may exist on your hard disk or across a network. In Part 4 of this book, starting in the next chapter, we will look at some of the underlying technology that makes Ubuntu work, and how you can gain more control over your computer. 13 introduces the BASH shell perhaps the most powerful piece of software offered by Ubuntu to control your system.
PART 4
The Shell and Beyond
Introducing the BASH Shell
s you learned in 1, strictly speaking, the word Linux refers to just the kernel, which is the fundamental, invisible program that runs your PC and lets everything happen. However, on its own, the kernel is completely useless. It needs programs to let users interact with the PC and do cool stuff, and it needs a lot of system files (also referred to as libraries) to provide vital functions. The GNU Project provides many of these low-level pieces of code and programs. This is why many people refer to the Linux operating system as GNU/Linux, giving credit to the fact that, without the GNU components, Linux wouldn t have gotten off the starting blocks. The GNU Project provides various shell programs, too. A shell is what the user interacts with on a day-to-day basis, whether by mouse or keyboard. The word originates from the fact that the shell is the outer layer of the operating system, which encompasses the kernel (and in some instances protects it by filtering out bad user commands!). Some shells offer graphical functionality but, in general, the word shell is understood to mean text-only interfaces. These text shell programs are also known as terminal programs, and they re often colloquially referred to as command-line prompts, in reference to the most important component they provide. This kind of shell lets you take control of your system in a quick and efficient way. By learning how to use the shell, you ll become the true master of your own system. In this part of the book, you ll learn all you need to know about using the shell. This chapter introduces the BASH shell, which is the default one in Ubuntu.
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