vb.net barcode library Using the Mouse in Java

Creator Code 3 of 9 in Java Using the Mouse

Using the Mouse
Generating Code 39 Extended In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scan Code 3 Of 9 In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
As noted earlier, the mouse works mostly the same under Ubuntu as it does under Windows: a left-click selects things, and a right-click usually brings up a context menu. Try rightclicking various items, such as icons on the desktop or even the desktop itself.
PDF 417 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1 DataBar-14 Creator In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar Limited image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Tip Right-clicking a blank spot on the desktop and selecting Create Launcher lets you create shortcuts to
Matrix 2D Barcode Drawer In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Creator In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
applications. Clicking Create Folder lets you create new empty folders.
Encode 1D In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create 1D image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode ANSI/AIM I-2/5 In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create Uniform Symbology Specification ITF image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You can use the mouse to drag icons on top of other icons. For example, you can drag a file onto a program icon in order to run it. You can also click and drag in certain areas to create an elastic band and, as in Windows, this lets you select more than one icon at once. You can resize windows using the mouse in much the same way as in Windows. Just click and drag the edges and corners of the windows. In addition, you can double-click the title bar to maximize and subsequently restore windows. Ubuntu also makes use of the third mouse button for middle-clicking. You might not think your mouse has one of these but, actually, if it s relatively modern, it probably does. Such mice have a scroll wheel between the buttons, and this can act as a third button when pressed. In Ubuntu, the main use of the middle mouse button is in copying and pasting, as described in the next section. Middle-clicking also has a handful of other functions; for example, middle-clicking the title bar of any open window will switch to the window underneath.
Printing Code 39 In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing Code 3/9 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Tip If your mouse doesn t have a scroll wheel, or if it has one that doesn t click, you can still middle-click.
Draw ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPhone Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print UPC Symbol In Visual C#
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Simply press the left and right mouse buttons at the same time. This emulates a middle-click, although it takes a little skill to get right. Generally speaking, you need to press one button a fraction of a second before you press the other button.
Paint QR-Code In Java
Using Barcode maker for BIRT Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognizing QR In C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 7 BOOTING UBUN TU FOR THE FIRST TIME
Painting EAN 128 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Cutting and Pasting Text
Code-128 Printer In Java
Using Barcode creation for BIRT Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Office Excel Control to generate, create Barcode image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Ubuntu offers two separate methods of cutting and pasting text. The first method is identical to that under Windows. In a word processor or another application that deals with text, you can click and drag the mouse to highlight text, right-click anywhere on it, and then select to copy or cut the text. In many programs, you can also use the keyboard shortcuts of Ctrl+X to cut, Ctrl+C to copy, and Ctrl+V to paste. However, there s a quicker method of copying and pasting. Simply click and drag to highlight some text, and then immediately click the middle mouse button where you want the text to appear. This will copy and paste the highlighted text automatically, as shown in Figure 7-8.
Painting QR In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Barcode image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 7-8. Highlight the text, and then middle-click to paste it instantly.
This special method of cutting and pasting bypasses the usual clipboard, so you should find that any text you ve copied or cut previously should still be there. The downside is that it doesn t work across all applications within Ubuntu, although it does work with the majority of them.
CH A PT ER 7 BO O TI NG UBUN TU FO R T HE FI RST T IME
Summary
This chapter covered booting into Ubuntu for the first time and discovering the desktop. We ve looked at starting programs, working with virtual desktops, using the mouse on the Ubuntu desktop, and much more. You should have become confident in some basic Ubuntu skills and should now be ready to learn more! In the next chapter, we ll look at getting your system up and running, focusing in particular on items of hardware that experience day-to-day use.
Getting Everything Up and Running
his chapter guides you through setting up all the essential components of your Ubuntu installation. This includes hardware configuration, as well as setting up e-mail. It covers the postinstallation steps necessary to get your system up and running efficiently. Like all modern Linux distributions, Ubuntu is practically automated when it comes to setting up key hardware and software components. Key software will work from the start, and most hardware will be automatically configured. However, you might need to tweak a few settings to make everything work correctly. Read on to learn more.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.