vb.net qr code dll Note The tar command is not only used for backup and restore; on the Internet you ll find many tar in Font

Encoder Data Matrix in Font Note The tar command is not only used for backup and restore; on the Internet you ll find many tar

Note The tar command is not only used for backup and restore; on the Internet you ll find many tar
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packaged software archives as well. Even when working in an environment in which a package manager is used, you ll find that occasionally you need to unpack tar archives as well. In the section Installing Software from Tarballs, you ll find more information.
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Creating an Archive File
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In its most basic form, tar is used to create an archive file. The typical command to do so is tar -cvf somefile /somedirectory. This tar command has a few arguments. First, you need to indicate what you want to do with the tar command. In this case, you want to create an archive. (That s why the option c is used; the c stands for create.) After that, I used the option v (verbose). Although it s not required, it often comes in handy because verbose output lets you see what the tar command is actually doing. I recommend always using this option because sometimes a tar job can take a really long time. (For instance, imagine creating a complete archive of everything that s on your hard drive.) In cases such as these, it s nice to be able to monitor what exactly happens and that s what the option v is meant to do.
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CHAPTER 3 PERFORMING ESSENTIAL SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION TASKS
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Next, you need to specify where you want the tar command to send its output. If you don t specify anything here, tar defaults to the standard output (STDOUT). In other words, it simply dumps all the data to your server s console. This doesn t accomplish much, so you should use the option f (file) to specify what file or device the output should be written to. In this example, I ve written the output to a file, but, alternatively, you can write output to a device file as well. For example, the command tar -cvf /dev/mt0 /somedir will write the result of the tar command to the /dev/mt0 device, which typically is your tape drive. The last part of the tar command specifies exactly what you want to put into your tar archive. In the example, the directory /somedir is archived. It s easy to forget this option, but if you do, tar will complain that it is cowardly refusing to create an empty archive. And you should know a couple of other things about tar. First, the order of arguments does matter. So there is a difference between tar -cvf /somefile /somedir and, for example, tar -f /somefile -vc /somedir. The order is wrong in the last part, and tar won t know what you want it to do. So, in all cases, first specify what you want tar to do. In most cases, it s either c (to create an archive), x (to extract an archive), or t (to list the contents of the archive). Then specify how you want tar to do that; for example, you can use v to tell tar that it should be verbose. Next, use the f option to indicate where you want tar to write the backup, and then specify what exactly you want to back up. Creating an archive with tar is useful, but you should be aware that tar doesn t compress one single bit of your archive. This is because tar was originally conceived as a tape streaming utility. It streams data to a file or (typically) a tape device. If you want tar to compress the contents of an archive as well, you must tell it to do so. And so tar has two options to compress the archive file: z: Use this option to compress the tar file with the gzip utility. This is the most popular compression utility because it has a pretty decent compression ratio and it doesn t take too long to create a compressed file. j: Use this option to compress the tar file with the bzip2 utility. This utility compresses 10 to 20 percent better than gzip2, but at a cost: it takes as twice as long. So, if you want to create a compressed archive of the directory /home and write that backup to a file with the name home.tar.gz, you would use the following command: tar -czvf home.tar.gz /home
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Note Of course, you can use the bzip2 and gzip utilities from the command line as well. Use gzip file.tar to compress file.tar. This command produces file.tar.gz as its result. To decompress that file, use gunzip file.tar.gz, which gives you the original file.tar back. If you want to do the same with bzip2, use bzip2 file.tar to create the compressed file. This creates a file with the name file.tar.bz2, which you can decompress using the command bunzip2 file.tar.bz2.
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