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These JARs (available in the Hibernate Search distribution) are a subset of the Solr distribution and contain analyzers. While optional, we recommend adding these JARs to your classpath because it greatly simplifies the use of analyzers. This feature is available beginning with Hibernate Search 3.1.
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Getting started with Hibernate Search
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You can put the full Solr distribution instead of the version provided by Hibernate Search in your classpath if you wish to.
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Hibernate Search is not compatible with all versions of Hibernate Core and Hibernate Annotations. It s best to refer to the compatibility matrix available on the Hibernate.org download page. At the time this book was written, the compatibility matrix tells us that:
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Hibernate Search 3.0.x is compatible with Hibernate Core 3.2.x starting from 3.2.2, Hibernate Annotations 3.3.x, and Hibernate EntityManager 3.3.x. Hibernate Search 3.1.x is compatible with Hibernate Core 3.3.x, Hibernate Annotations 3.4.x, and Hibernate EntityManager 3.4.x. You can find dependencies that Hibernate Search has been built on and initially tested on in the Hibernate Search distribution or in the Maven dependency file (POM). Hibernate Search is published to the JBoss Maven repository (http:/ /repository.jboss.org/maven2/org/hibernate/ hibernate-search).
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If you use Hibernate Annotations, hibernate-commons-annotations.jar is already present in your classpath. Adding a JAR to your classpath depends on your deployment environment. It s virtually impossible to describe all likely deployments, but we ll go through a few of them. In an SE environment, the JAR list is provided to the virtual machine thanks to a command-line argument:
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# on Windows platforms java -classpath hibernate-search.jar;lucene-core.jar ;hibernate-commons-annotations.jar;solr-core.jar ... my.StartupClass
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# on Unix, Linux and Mac OS X platforms java -classpath hibernate-search.jar:lucene-core.jar: hibernate-commons-annotations.jar:solr-core.jar ... my.StartupClass
If you happen to deploy your Hibernate application in a WAR (Web Archive) either deployed in a naked servlet container or a full-fledged Java EE application server, things are a bit simpler; you just need to add the necessary JARs into the lib directory of your WAR.
<WAR ROOT> WEB-INF classes [contains your application classes] lib hibernate-search.jar lucene-core.jar hibernate-commons-annotations.jar solr-core.jar
Setting up Hibernate Search
solr-common.jar lucene-snowball.jar [contains other third party libraries] ...
You could also put Hibernate Search-required JARs as a common library in your servlet container or application server. The authors don t recommend such a strategy because it forces all deployed applications to use the same Hibernate Search version. Some support or operation teams tend to dislike such a strategy, and they ll let you know it. If you deploy your application in an EAR (Enterprise Archive) in a Java EE application server, one of the strategies is to put the third-party libraries in the EAR s lib directory (or in the library-directory value in META-INF/application.xml if you happen to override it).
<EAR_ROOT> myejbjar1.jar mywar.war META-INF ... lib hibernate-search.jar lucene-core.jar hibernate-commons-annotations.jar solr-core.jar solr-common.jar lucene-snowball.jar [contains other third party libraries] ...
Unfortunately, this solution works only for Java EE 5 application servers and above. If you re stuck with a J2EE application server, you ll need to add a Class-Path entry in each META-INF/MANFEST.MF file of any component that depends on Hibernate Search. Listing 2.1 and listing 2.2 describe how to do it.
Listing 2.1 MANIFEST.MF declaring a dependency on Hibernate Search
Manifest-Version: 1.0 Class-Path: lib/hibernate-search.jar lib/lucene-core.jar lib/hibernate-commons-annotations.jar lib/solr-core.jar ...
Listing 2.2
Structure of the EAR containing Hibernate Search
<EAR_ROOT> myejbjar1.jar META-INF/MANIFEST.MF (declaring the dependency on Hibernate Search) mywar.war META-INF ... lib hibernate-search.jar lucene-core.jar
Getting started with Hibernate Search
hibernate-commons-annotations.jar solr-core.jar solr-common.jar lucene-snowball.jar [contains other third party libraries] ...
The Class-Path entry is a space-separated list of JARs or directory URLs relative to where the referencing archive is (in our example, EAR root). Believe it or not, you just did the hardest part of the configuration! The next step is to tell Hibernate Search where to put the Lucene index structure.
Providing configuration
Once Hibernate Search is properly set up in your classpath, the next step is to indicate where the Apache Lucene indexes will be stored. You will place your Hibernate Search configuration in the same location where you placed your Hibernate Core configuration. Fortunately, you do not need another configuration file. When you use Hibernate Core (possibly with Hibernate Annotations), you can provide the configuration parameters in three ways:
In a hibernate.cfg.xml file In the /hibernate.properties file Through the configuration API and specifically configuration.setProperty(String, String)
The first solution is the most commonly used. Hibernate Search properties are regular Hibernate properties and fit in these solutions. When you use Hibernate EntityManager, the standard way to provide configuration parameters is to use the METAINF/persistence.xml file. Injecting Hibernate Search properties into this file is also supported. This is good news for us, in that there s no need to think about yet another configuration file to package! What kind of configuration parameters does Hibernate Search need Not a lot by default. Hibernate Search has been designed with the idea of configuration by exception in mind. This design concept uses the 80 percent-20 percent rule by letting the 80 percent scenarios be the default configuration. Of course, it s always possible to override the default in case we fall into the 20 percent scenarios. The configurationby-exception principle will be more visible and more useful when we start talking about mapping. Let s look at a concrete example. When using Hibernate Search, you need to tell the library where to find Apache Lucene indexes. By default, Hibernate Search assumes you want to store your indexes in a file directory; this is a good assumption because it provides a good trade-off between performance and index size. However, you ll probably want to define the actual directory where the indexes will be stored. The property name is hibernate.search.default.indexBase, so depending on the configuration strategy used, the configuration will be updated as shown in listing 2.3.
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