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APPENDIX A
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irb(main):001:0> array = ['Toronto', 'Miami', 'Paris'] => ["Toronto", "Miami", "Paris"] irb(main):002:0> => "Toronto" irb(main):003:0> => "New York" array[0] array[1]='New York'
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irb(main):004:0> array << 'London' => ["Toronto", "New York", "Paris", "London"] The Hash object offers another way to keep a collection. Hashes are different from arrays, because they store items using a key. Hash objects prior to Ruby 1.9 didn t preserve order; it didn t matter in which order you defined your hash, and you could retrieve it using the key you stored it with. In Ruby 1.9, hash objects preserve order, just like arrays, which enables you to call certain methods on them for example, hash.first to get the first key, value pair. In Ruby, you often use symbols for hash keys, but in reality, any object can function as a key. You define hashes with curly braces, {}. You can create a Hash object by defining it with {:key => "value", :other_key => "other value" }. Then, you can pull out data by using square brackets on the end of the list. For instance, you retrieve a value by saying @my_hash[:key] from the @my_hash variable. Here are some examples: irb(main):005:0> hash = {:canada => 'Toronto', :france => 'Paris', :uk => 'London'} => {:canada=>"Toronto", :france=>"Paris", :uk=>"London"} irb(main):006:0> => "London" irb(main):007:0> => "Calgary" hash[:uk] hash[:canada] = 'Calgary'
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irb(main):008:0> hash.first => [:canada, "Calgary"] irb(main):009:0> hash => {:canada=>"Calgary", :france=>"Paris", :uk=>"London"} Notice that on the second line, you redefine what goes into the :canada key. By passing in "Calgary", you override the value of "Toronto" from the preceding command.
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Like other programming languages, Ruby includes variables, operators, control-flow statements, and methods. This section shows you how to use them.
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APPENDIX A
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Variables are used to hold values you want to keep for later processing. When you perform a calculation, you probably want to use the result of that calculation somewhere else in your application code, and that s when you need a variable. In Ruby, variables are easily created. You just need to give a variable a name and assign a value to it; there s no need to specify a data type for the variable or define it in your code before you use it. Let s create a few variables to hold some values you may need later. Notice that you can reuse a variable name by reassigning a value: irb(main):001:0> test_variable = 'This is a string' => "This is a string" irb(main):002:0> => 2010 irb(main):003:0> => 232.3 test_variable = 2010 test_variable = 232.3
You ve created a variable named test_variable and assigned a few different values to it. Because everything in Ruby is an object, the test_variable variable holds a reference to the object you assigned. Variable names can be any sequence of numbers and letters, as long as they start with a letter or an underscore; however, the first character of a variable indicates the type of the variable. Variables also have a scope, which is the context in which the variable is defined. Some variables are used in a small snippet of code and need to exist for only a short period of time; those are called local variables. Table A-1 lists the different types of variables supported by Ruby and shows how to recognize them when you re coding. Type some variable names in irb, and you ll get results similar to those shown here. Table A-1. Ruby Variables
Example
@@count
Description
Class variables start with @@. Class variables exist in the scope of a class, so all instances of a specific class have a single value for the class variable. Instance variables start with @. Instance variables are unique to a given instance of a class. You can create a constant in Ruby by capitalizing the first letter of a variable, but it s a convention that constants are written in all uppercase characters. Constants are variables that don t change throughout the execution of a program. In Ruby, constants can be reassigned; however, you get a warning from the interpreter if you do so. Local variables start with a lowercase letter, and they live for only a short period of time. They usually exist only inside the method or block of code where they re first assigned.
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