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You can pass an explicit status code number to assert_response, such as Tip
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assert_response(501) or its symbolic equivalent assert_response(:not_implemented). See http://iana.org/assignments/http-status-codes for the full list of codes and default messages
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We also want to assert that the proper template was rendered in response to the request, for which we use another of Rails custom assertions: assert_template. Here, we expect to see the index template (from app/views/events/list.rhtml) to be rendered, so test this expectation.
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assert_template 'index'
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There s one more thing we need to do: assert that the correct instance variables were assigned. If you look at the events controller, you ll see that we set an instance variable called @events that contains the events collection. Rails gives us the ability to test whether this assignment was successful by way of the assigns method.
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assert_not_nil assigns(:events)
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This asserts that @events was, in fact, assigned (by virtue of the fact that it shouldn t be nil). We can use this technique to test for the existence of any instance variable set within our controllers. Useful, isn t it Using assigns actually gives us access to the instance variable, so we can do with it as we please.
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Testing the Show Action
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Listing 9-13 shows the test_show case.
CHAPTER 9 TESTING YOUR APPLICATION
Listing 9-13. Test Case for the Show Action
def test_show get :show, :id => @first_id assert_response :success assert_template 'show' assert_not_nil assigns(:event) assert assigns(:event).valid end
The test_show case is almost the same as test_index, but with one notable difference: we need to identify the record we want to show. If we were requesting this in a browser, the URL would look like /events/show/1. Therefore, we need to pass in the :id parameter with a value of 1. If you look closely at the test request, you can see how this is done.
get :show, :id => @first_id
The @first_id variable is the one we set in the index method and is the id attribute of the event we grabbed from the :tiki_party fixture. We can pass arbitrary parameters in this fashion. You ll see more of this when we test the create and update actions, both of which require a set of event parameters. One more thing to notice here: we can treat the result of assigns(:event) as we would any Event object and call methods on it.
assert assigns(:event).valid
So, not only can we assert that there is an instance variable named @event, we can assert that it contains a valid Event object. We can safely skip the test_new case as it introduces nothing new; the test_create case, on the other hand, is full of goodies.
Testing the Create Action
Listing 9-14 shows the test_create case. Notice how we re using the login_as helper, since this action expects a logged-in user.
Listing 9-14. Test Case for the Create Action
def test_create login_as(:eugene) num_events = Event.count
CHAPTER 9 TESTING YOUR APPLICATION
post :create, :event => { :title => 'Test title', :url => 'http://example.com', :location => 'Test location' } assert_response :redirect assert_redirected_to :action => 'list' assert_equal num_events + 1, Event.count end
To test the create action, we actually need to submit some form parameters to create a valid event. Fortunately, this is an easy affair. All we need to do is pass a hash of parameters that contains a valid set of event attributes, just as we would using an HTML form (remember that HTML form parameters are converted into a hash object by Rails). Here s how it s done:
post :create, :event => { :title => 'Test title', :url => 'http://example.com', :location => 'Test location' }
Unlike the other test cases we ve looked at so far, the test_create case uses a request method other than GET. To create a new event, we need to use the POST method. We formulate a POST request that includes a params hash with a valid event. Next, we come across another of Rails additions to Test::Unit, assert_redirected_to. As you can gather from its name, this lets you assert that a redirect to the expected location took place in response to the request. This match can be partial; for example, assert_redirected_to(:controller => 'events') will also match the redirection of redirect_to(:controller => 'events', :action => 'list').
assert_redirected_to(options, message)
Since we want to know whether or not a new event was created, we store the number of events in the database before we start. When we re finished, we assert that there s one more event using assert_equal.
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