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$ ruby test/unit/event_test.rb
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Loaded suite test/unit/event_test Started .. Finished in 0.133271 seconds. 2 tests, 2 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
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Sure enough, finding works! So far, so good.
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Adding an Update Test
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Our next move is to test updating. Add the test_should_update_event case, as shown in Listing 9-6.
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CHAPTER 9 TESTING YOUR APPLICATION
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Listing 9-6. Test Case for Updating an Event, in test/unit/event_test.rb
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def test_should_update_event event = events(:tiki_party) assert event.update_attributes(:title => 'New title') end
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First, we find the Tiki Party event from our fixture, and then we assert that changing the title via update_attributes returns true. Once again, run the test and see what happens.
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$ ruby test/unit/event_test.rb
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Loaded suite test/unit/event_test Started ... Finished in 0.226404 seconds. 3 tests, 3 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
Adding a Destroy Test
Only one more test to go: destroy. We ll find an event, destroy it, and assert that Active Record raises an exception when we try to find it again. Listing 9-7 shows the test.
Listing 9-7. Test Case for Destroying an Event, in test/unit/event_test.rb
def test_should_destroy_event event = events(:tiki_party) event.destroy assert_raise(ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound) { Event.find(event.id) } end
The assert_raise assertion takes the class of the exception we expect to be raised for whatever we do inside the given block. Since we ve destroyed the event, we expect Active Record to respond with a RecordNotFound exception when we try to find it by id. Run the test and see what happens.
$ ruby test/unit/event_test.rb
CHAPTER 9 TESTING YOUR APPLICATION
Loaded suite test/unit/event_test Started .... Finished in 0.215428 seconds. 4 tests, 4 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
And there you have it. We ve successfully tested event CRUD.
Testing Validations
We have a few validations on our Event model, specifically for the presence of a title and location. Since we want to make sure these are working as expected, we need to test them. Add the method shown in Listing 9-8 to test that we can t create invalid events.
Listing 9-8. Test Case for Validations, in test/unit/event_test.rb
def test_should_not_create_invalid_event event = Event.new assert !event.valid assert event.errors.invalid (:title) assert event.errors.invalid (:location) assert_equal "can't be blank", event.errors.on(:title) assert_equal "can't be blank", event.errors.on(:location) assert !event.save end
This is pretty straightforward, though you might have to read it through a few times before it clicks. First, we instantiate a new Event object in the local variable event. Without having given it any attributes, we expect it to be invalid. So, we assert that it s not valid using assert !event.valid (notice the !, which negates truth). Next, we access the errors collection to explicitly check for the attributes we expect to be invalid:
assert event.errors.invalid (:title) assert event.errors.invalid (:location)
We also want to check that the validation responses are what we expect. To do this, we re using the assert_equal assertion. Here s its basic syntax:
assert_equal(expected, actual)
CHAPTER 9 TESTING YOUR APPLICATION
To check the error messages, we again access the errors collection, but this time we ask for the specific messages associated with the given attribute.
assert_equal "can't be blank", event.errors.on(:title) assert_equal "can't be blank", event.errors.on(:location)
Finally, we assert that event.save returns false using !event.save. Run the test one more time.
$ ruby test/unit/event_test.rb
Loaded suite test/unit/event_test Started ..... Finished in 0.304773 seconds. 5 tests, 10 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
Feels good, doesn t it Life isn t all roses, though, and requirements change. What if one day we decide to make a change to the Event model and remove the validation requirements for the title attribute Well, if that were to happen, our test would fail. If you want to try it, open the Event model in app/models/event.rb and remove :title from the validates_presence_of declaration, and then run the tests again. When your requirements change, you often need to update your tests. We recommend updating the tests first, (which should make them fail), and then updating your code (which would make them pass).
Functional Testing Your Controllers
Tests to check your controllers are called functional tests. When we were testing our models, we weren t testing them in the context of the web application there were no web requests and responses, nor were there any URLs to contend with. This focused approach lets us home in on the specific functionality of the model and test it in isolation. Alas, Rails is for building web applications, and while unit testing models is important, it s equally important to test the full request/response cycle.
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