how to generate barcode in c# net with example The Shebang Line in Font

Encode Data Matrix ECC200 in Font The Shebang Line

The Shebang Line
Painting Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating Barcode In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
On Unix-related operating systems (Linux, OS X, BSD, and so on) you can engineer your program to run more simply by using a shebang line.
Code 39 Full ASCII Creation In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Note In certain situations, such as when using the Apache HTTP server, shebang lines can work in
Data Matrix ECC200 Maker In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make QR Code 2d Barcode In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create QR image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Windows. You can use shebang lines such as #!ruby and #!c:\ruby\bin\ruby.exe to make Ruby CGI scripts work under Apache on Windows.
EAN / UCC - 13 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating UPC-E Supplement 5 In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create UPC - E0 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 10 DEPLOYING RUBY APPLICATIONS AND LIBRARIES
Painting Data Matrix ECC200 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Reader In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
For example, say your script were to look like this:
QR-Code Reader In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
EAN13 Generator In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
#!/usr/bin/ruby puts "Your program works!"
Drawing Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generation for BIRT Control to generate, create Barcode image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode PDF 417 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Unix-related operating systems support putting the name of the interpreter of a file on the first line of the file with a shebang line, where the shebang is simply the pound (#) sign and the exclamation mark (!).
Barcode Printer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Note The shebang line only needs to be in the file that s initially run. It doesn t need to be in library or
Generating Matrix Barcode In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Matrix image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
support files used by the main program.
Generate QR Code JIS X 0510 In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
DataMatrix Printer In Java
Using Barcode generation for BIRT reports Control to generate, create ECC200 image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
In this case, /usr/bin/ruby, the Ruby interpreter, is used to interpret the rest of the file. One problem you might run into, though, is that your Ruby interpreter might be located in /usr/bin/local/ruby or have a different name entirely. However, there s a reasonably portable way to work around this problem. Many Unix-related operating systems (including most Linuxes and OS X) have a tool called env that stores the location of certain applications and settings. You can use this to load up Ruby without knowing its exact location. For example:
#!/usr/bin/env ruby puts "Your program works!"
You could copy this example to many different Linux or OS X machines, for example, and it would work on the majority (env is not universal). If this script were called test.rb and located in the current working directory, you could simply run it from a command line, like so:
./test.rb
Note On most Unix-like operating systems, as well as adding a shebang line, it s necessary to make the
Ruby script executable by using chmod for the preceding example to work, as in chmod +x test.rb.
CHAPTER 10 DEPLOYING RUBY APPLICATIONS AND LIBRARIES
Naturally, if you copied the script elsewhere (/usr/bin, for example), you could access it directly:
/usr/bin/test.rb
Or if the script s location is in the path, it s even easier:
test.rb
Associated File Types in Windows
Whereas shebang lines are used on Unix-like operating systems, Windows users are more familiar with file extensions (such as DOC, EXE, JPG, MP3, or TXT) dictating how a file is processed. If you use My Computer or Windows Explorer to find a folder containing a Ruby file, the file might or might not already be associated with the Ruby interpreter (depending on which Ruby package you installed). Alternatively, Ruby files might be associated with your text editor. In any case, if you want to be able to double-click Ruby files in Windows and have them run directly as regular Ruby programs, you can do this by changing the default action for files with an extension of RB (or any other arbitrary extension you wish to use). The easiest way to set an association is to right-click the icon representing a Ruby file and choose the Open With (or Open, if it s currently not associated with any program) option from the menu. Associate the program with the ruby.exe Ruby interpreter on your computer, and check the Always use the selected program to open this kind of file option. This will cause Ruby files to be executed directly by the Ruby interpreter in future.
Note Microsoft provides more information about this technique at http://support.microsoft.
com/kb/307859.
Compiling Ruby
The shebang line and associated file type options involve collecting all the Ruby source code associated with an application and passing it on to a user, who then either has to run it from a command line or create a file association.
CHAPTER 10 DEPLOYING RUBY APPLICATIONS AND LIBRARIES
For nontechnical users, these options can prove confusing, and compared to deploying a typical application for Linux, OS X, or Windows they make Ruby look unprofessional. This is the nature of deploying code written in an interpreted language, because Ruby cannot be compiled down to a single, tidy executable file that can be used like any other executable file. However, some clever developers have come up with a couple different systems to work around this problem and give the impression of creating a single, compiled executable file. One trick is to embed a Ruby interpreter and the source code into a single file and then use these components to make the application work transparently.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.