c# barcode generator library free "test"[0].chr in Font

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"test"[0].chr
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CHAPTER 11 ADVANCED RUBY FEATURES
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With Japanese, however:
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" "[0].chr
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<..nothing or a junk result..> Because the Japanese characters are represented by more than one byte each, Ruby cannot work with them properly. Instead, it just picks off the first byte with [0] as opposed to the first character and tries to convert that meaningless byte s value back into a character. One workaround provided by Ruby 1.8 is called jcode. This mechanism comes with Ruby and puts Ruby into a mode that has bare support for UTF-8 (or other character encodings, mostly related to Japanese, but we won t consider those here). UTF-8 is the most commonly used system of representing Unicode characters. By default, UTF-8 characters only take up one byte (for English alphabet characters, say), but, where necessary, will use more than one byte (for Japanese, Chinese, and so on). Using jcode you can make regular expressions UTF-8 aware:
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$KCODE = 'u' require 'jcode' " ".scan(/./) do |character| puts character end
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This result ensues:
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Setting the $KCODE global variable to 'u' (for UTF-8) and loading jcode gives regular expressions awareness of UTF-8 characters, giving you each multibyte character correctly in the scan loop. Unfortunately this awareness spreads only to regular expressions, meaning that other Ruby methods such as length, first, last, and picking individual characters from strings using [] don t work properly on these strings. There have been some noble projects to give strings methods that work in the same way as the default ones, but on UTF-8 strings. Most of these use regular expressions to get their results, and are therefore a lot slower than the built-in Ruby methods. For example:
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$KCODE = 'u' require 'jcode'
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class String def reverse scan(/./).reverse.join end end puts " ".reverse
Here s the result:
In this example you override the reverse method in class String and implement your own using scan. This yields the correct result when working with the UTF-8 encoding.
Note Further information about this technique is available at http://redhanded.hobix.com/
inspect/closingInOnUnicodeWithJcode.html.
In mid-2006 a more permanent workaround was developed for Ruby 1.8 called ActiveSupport::Multibyte, now a standard part of the Ruby on Rails framework. (You can also download the library in a standalone form at https://fngtps.com/projects/ multibyte_for_rails) ActiveSupport::Multibyte provides a basic proxy method called chars that gives access to the true characters within a string (rather than simply each block of 8 bits). It allows you to write examples like these:
puts " ".chars.reverse
With this result:
puts " ".chars[1..2]
Here s the result:
There is a more full discussion of ActiveSupport::Multibyte at http://www. ruby-forum.com/topic/81976.
CHAPTER 11 ADVANCED RUBY FEATURES
Note Conversion between different character encodings is provided by the iconv library, covered in
16.
Summary
In this chapter we ve looked at an array of advanced Ruby topics, from dynamic code execution to writing high-performance functions in the C programming language. This chapter is the last chapter that covers general Ruby-related knowledge that any intermediate Ruby programmer should be familiar with. In 12 we ll be taking a different approach and will develop an entire Ruby application, much as we did in 4. Let s reflect on the main concepts covered in this chapter: Binding: A binding is a representation of a scope (execution) context as an object. Forking: When an instance of a program duplicates itself into two processes, one as a parent and one as a child, both continuing execution. Tainted data: Data whose source or origin cannot be entirely trusted or is unknown. Safe levels: Different safe levels result in the Ruby interpreter having different restrictions upon what code it will process and execute. Win32API: A Ruby library that gives you access to the Windows API: a set of libraries offering functions that provide access to the Windows kernel, graphics interface, control library, networking services, and user interface. Windows Automation (also known as OLE Automation): A system that allows Windows applications to register servers for themselves that allow other applications to control them remotely. You can learn more at http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/OLE_Automation. Threads: Separate strands of execution that run concurrently to each other. Ruby s threads are implemented entirely by the Ruby interpreter, but in general threads can also operate at the operating system level and are a commonly used tool in application development. C: A compiled, high-performance language developed in the 1970s that s used in most of the world s operating systems and low-level software. You can use C code within Ruby using the RubyInline library.
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