barcode generator in c# windows application codeproject Common Sequence Operations in Font

Creator PDF 417 in Font Common Sequence Operations

Common Sequence Operations
PDF417 Drawer In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print QR Code In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
There are certain things you can do with all sequence types. These operations include indexing, slicing, adding, multiplying, and checking for membership. In addition, Python has built-in functions for finding the length of a sequence, and for finding its largest and smallest elements.
Encode Code 128 Code Set C In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate Universal Product Code Version A In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Note One important operation not covered here is iteration. To iterate over a sequence means to perform certain actions repeatedly, once per element in the sequence. To learn more about this, see the section Loops in 5.
Data Matrix ECC200 Generation In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 2 LISTS AND TUPLES
Painting Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
USD8 Maker In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create Code11 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Indexing
PDF417 Scanner In VB.NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF417 Decoder In Visual C#
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
All elements in a sequence are numbered from zero and upwards. You can access them individually with a number, like this: >>> greeting = 'Hello' >>> greeting[0] 'H'
Make Denso QR Bar Code In None
Using Barcode creation for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1 128 Encoder In None
Using Barcode creator for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Office Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Note A string is just a sequence of characters. The index 0 refers to the first element, in this case the letter H.
Draw UPC-A Supplement 5 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code-39 Printer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
This is called indexing you use an index to fetch an element. All sequences can be indexed in this way. When you use a negative index, Python counts from the right, that is, from the last element. The last element is at position 1 (not 0, as that would be the same as the first element): >>> greeting[-1] 'o' String literals (and other sequence literals, for that matter) may be indexed directly, without using a variable to refer to them. The effect is exactly the same: >>> 'Hello'[1] 'e' If a function call returns a sequence, you can index it directly. For instance, if you are simply interested in the fourth digit in a year entered by the user, you could do something like this: >>> fourth = raw_input('Year: ')[3] Year: 2005 >>> fourth '5'
Print UCC.EAN - 128 In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPhone Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Code128 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Office Excel Control to generate, create Code 128B image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Example
UCC.EAN - 128 Creation In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognize ECC200 In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Listing 2-1 contains an example program that asks you for a year, a month (as a number from 1 to 12), and a day (1 to 31), and then prints out the date with the proper month name and so on. An example session with this program might be as follows: Year: 1974 Month (1-12): 8 Day (1-31): 16 August 16th, 1974 The last line is the output from the program.
Code128 Encoder In C#.NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1-128 Creator In None
Using Barcode creation for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 2 LISTS AND TUPLES
Listing 2-1. Indexing Example # Print out a date, given year, month, and day as numbers months = [ 'January', 'February', 'March', 'April', 'May', 'June', 'July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November', 'December' ] # A list with one ending for each number from 1 to 31 endings = ['st', 'nd', 'rd'] + 17 * ['th'] \ + ['st', 'nd', 'rd'] + 7 * ['th'] \ + ['st'] year month day = raw_input('Year: ') = raw_input('Month (1-12): ') = raw_input('Day (1-31): ')
month_number = int(month) day_number = int(day) # Remember to subtract 1 from month and day to get a correct index month_name = months[month_number-1] ordinal = day + endings[day_number-1] print month_name + ' ' + ordinal + ', ' + year
Slicing
Just as you use indexing to access individual elements, you can use slicing to access ranges of elements. You do this by using two indices, separated by a colon: >>> tag = '<a href="http://www.python.org">Python web site</a>' >>> tag[9:30] 'http://www.python.org' >>> tag[32:-4] 'Python web site'
CHAPTER 2 LISTS AND TUPLES
As you can see, slicing is very useful for extracting parts of a sequence. The numbering here is very important. The first index is the number of the first element you want to include. However, the last index is the number of the first element after your slice. Consider the following: >>> >>> [4, >>> [1] numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] numbers[3:6] 5, 6] numbers[0:1]
In short, you supply two indices as limits for your slice, where the first is inclusive, and the second is exclusive.
A Nifty Shortcut
Let s say you want to access the last three elements of numbers (from the previous example). You could do it explicitly, of course: >>> numbers[7:10] [8, 9, 10] Now, the index 10 refers to element 11 which does not exist, but is one step after the last element you want. Got it Now, this is fine, but what if you want to count from the end >>> numbers[-3:-1] [8, 9] It seems you cannot access the last element this way. How about using 0 as the element one step beyond the end >>> numbers[-3:0] [] Not exactly the desired result. In fact, any time the leftmost index in a slice comes later in the sequence than the second one (in this case, the third-to-last coming later than the first), the result is always an empty sequence. Luckily, you can use a shortcut: If the slice continues to the end of the sequence, you may simply leave out the last index: >>> numbers[-3:] [8, 9, 10] The same thing works from the beginning: >>> numbers[:3] [1, 2, 3] In fact, if you want to copy the entire sequence, you may leave out both indices: >>> numbers[:] [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.