DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION in Font

Generator ECC200 in Font DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION

CHAPTER 3 DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION
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Figure 3-29. A branching condition
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10. Repeat step 9 to create a Conditional Branch from the Check Item Status action. If the item is in stock, add a Transition to an Update Item Status action state under the Item partition. If the item is out of stock, add a Transition to the Deny Loan action state under the Librarian partition. 11. From the Update Item Status action state, add a Transition shape to a Record Loan Info action state under the Loan partition. 12. From the Record Loan Info action state, add a Transition shape to a Confirm Loan action state under the Librarian partition. 13. From the Shapes toolbar, click the Final State shape and add it to the bottom of the Member partition. Add a Transition shape from Deny Loan to the Final action state. Add another Transition shape from the Confirm Loan action state to the Final action state. 14. Your completed diagram should be similar to the one shown in Figure 3-30. Save the project and exit UML Modeler.
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CHAPTER 3 DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION
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Figure 3-30. Completed activity diagram
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Exploring GUI Design
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Thus far, the discussions of object-oriented analysis and design have focused on modeling the functional design and the internal processing of the application. Successful modern software applications rely on a rich set of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) to expose this functionality to the users of the application. In modern software systems, one of the most important aspects of an application is how well it interacts with the users. Gone are the days when users would interact with the application by typing cryptic commands at the DOS prompt. Modern operating systems employ GUIs, which are, for the most part, intuitive to use. Users have also grown used to the polished interfaces of the commercial office-productivity applications. Users have come to expect the same ease of use and intuitiveness built into applications developed in-house. The design of the user interface should not be done haphazardly; rather, it should be planned in conjunction with the business logic design. The success of most applications is judged by the response of the users toward the application. If users are not comfortable when interacting with the application and the application does not improve the productivity of the user, it is doomed to failure. To the user, the application is the interface. It does not matter how pristine and clever the business logic code may be; if the user interface is poorly designed and implemented, the application will not be acceptable to the users. It is often hard for developers to remember that it is the user who drives the software development. Although UML was not specifically designed for GUI design, many software architects and programmers have employed some of the UML diagrams to help when modeling the user interface of the application.
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CHAPTER 3 DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION
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GUI Activity Diagrams
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The first step in developing a user interface design is to perform a task analysis to discover how users will need to interact with the system. The task analysis is based on the use cases and scenarios that have been modeled previously. You can then develop activity diagrams to model how the interaction between the user and the system will take place. Figure 3-31 shows an activity diagram modeling the activities the user goes through to record rental information.
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CHAPTER 3 DESIGNING OOP SOLUTIONS: MODELING THE OBJECT INTERACTION
Interface Prototyping
After you have identified and prioritized the necessary tasks, you can develop a prototype sketch of the various screens that will make up the user interface. Figure 3-32 shows a prototype sketch of the Customer Info screen.
Figure 3-32. GUI prototype sketch
Interface Flow Diagrams
Once you have prototyped the various screens, you can use interface flow diagrams to model the relationships and flow patterns among the screens that make up the user interface. Figure 3-33 shows a partial interface flow diagram for the video rental application.
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