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Table 2-9 shows some examples of SQL functions.
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INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER
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Table 2-9. Examples of SQL Functions
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Function
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AVG(MSAL) SQRT(16) LENGTH(INIT) LOWER(ENAME) SUBSTR(ENDDATE,4,3)
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Explanation
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The average monthly salary The square root of 16 The number of characters in the INIT column value ENAME column value, in lowercase Three characters of the ENDDATE column value, from the fourth position
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Oracle even allows you to create your own SQL functions by using the PL/SQL or Java languages. 5 will show a simple example of a user-defined function.
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Database Object Naming
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All objects in a database need names. This applies to tables, columns, views, indexes, synonyms, sequences, users, roles, constraints, functions, and so on. In general, to enhance the readability of your SQL code, it is highly recommended that you restrict yourself to using the characters A through Z, the digits 0 through 9, and optionally the underscore (_).
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Note In Oracle, object names are case-insensitive; that is, internally all database object names are converted to uppercase, regardless of how you enter those names.
You may use digits in database object names; however, database object names should always start with a letter. Oracle object names have a maximum length of 30 characters. Database objects need different names to be able to distinguish them, obviously. To be more precise, database objects need unique names within their namespace. On the other hand, different database users may use the same names for their own objects if they like, because the owner/object name combination is used to uniquely identify an object in the database. If you insist on creating your own object names in Oracle SQL using any characters you like (including, for example, spaces and other strange characters), and you also want your object names to be case-sensitive, you can include those names within double quotes. The only restriction that remains is the maximum name length: 30 characters. Using this feature is discouraged, because you will always need to include those names in double quotes again in every interactive SQL statement you want to execute against those objects. On the other hand, you can use this technique in written applications to prevent conflicts with reserved words, including reserved words of future DBMS versions not known to you at application development time. Actually, several Oracle database utilities use this technique under the hood for precisely this reason.
INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER
Comments
You can add comments to SQL commands in order to clarify their intent or to enhance their maintainability. In other words, you can add text that does not formally belong to the SQL statements themselves, and as such should be ignored by the Oracle DBMS. You can add such comments in two ways: between /* and */ or after two consecutive minus signs. Comments after two minus signs are implicitly ended by a newline character; comments between /* and */ can span multiple lines. See Listing 2-1 for two examples. Listing 2-1. SQL Comments Examples /* this text will be considered a comment, so the Oracle DBMS will ignore it ... */ -- and this text too, until the end of this line. Listing 2-1 shows how you can add comments to SQL commands. Note that you can also add comments to database objects with the COMMENT command. See 7 for details.
Reserved Words
Just like any other language, SQL has a list of reserved words. These are words you are not allowed to use, for example, as database object names. If you insist on using a reserved word as an object name, you must enclose the name within double quotes, as explained earlier in the Database Object Naming section. These are some examples of SQL reserved words: AND, CREATE, DROP, FROM, GRANT, HAVING, INDEX, INSERT, MODIFY, NOT, NULL, NUMBER, OR, ORDER, RENAME, REVOKE, SELECT, SYNONYM, SYSDATE, TABLE, UPDATE, USER, VALUES, VIEW, and WHERE.
Tip The Oracle data dictionary contains a V$RESERVED_WORDS view. You can check your object names against this view to avoid using reserved words.
See Appendix A of this book, and also the Oracle SQL Reference for more details about naming rules for database objects and a more complete listing of SQL reserved words.
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