create barcode using vb.net INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER in Java

Printer DataMatrix in Java INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER

INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER
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The ability to retrieve the last SQL statement from the SQL buffer is often very useful when you need to correct errors and re-execute the SQL statement. You will see how to do this in the subsequent sections, where we ll also discuss some other SQL*Plus commands related to the SQL buffer. If you enter a second SQL command, the SQL buffer is overwritten, and you lose the previous SQL command. In the Saving Commands section later in this chapter, you will see an easy method to save SQL commands for reuse in SQL*Plus. Note from the example in Listing 2-3 that the SQL command returned from the SQL buffer did not include a semicolon at the end of it. The semicolon is not part of the SQL command itself, and it does not end up in the SQL buffer. If you enter a SQL command (or even a portion of a SQL command) and press the Enter key twice, without first adding a semicolon, the command will not be executed, but it will be saved in the SQL buffer. The SQL*Plus commands you enter are not stored in the SQL buffer. You can run as many SQL*Plus commands as you like, but another SQL*Plus LIST command will display the same SQL command. From the example in Listing 2-3, you can also note several other things about SQL*Plus commands: They are normally executed on a single line, unlike most SQL commands. You don t need to enter a semicolon to execute SQL*Plus commands. They execute immediately when you press the Enter key. SQL*Plus commands can be abbreviated (L stands for LIST), whereas SQL commands cannot.
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Rather than just see what is in the buffer, it is often useful to be able to edit its contents and then reexecute the SQL, so let s now move on to discuss how to do that.
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Using an External Editor
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You can edit the contents of the SQL buffer in two ways: Use an external editor of your choice Use the built-in SQL*Plus editor
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The main advantage of the SQL*Plus editor is that its functionality is always available in SQL*Plus, and the editor is totally independent of the underlying platform. The disadvantage of the SQL*Plus editor is its lack of user-friendliness and its very limited capabilities. This section explains how to use an external editor to edit your SQL commands. The next section will discuss the built-in SQL*Plus editor. The default external editor under Microsoft Windows is Notepad. You can also change or display the SQL*Plus external editor preference from the command line by using the DEFINE command, as shown in Listing 2-4. Listing 2-4. Displaying and Changing the External Editor Preference SQL> define _editor=Notepad SQL> define _editor DEFINE _EDITOR SQL> = "Notepad" (CHAR)
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INTRODUCTION TO SQL, SQL*PLUS, AND SQL DEVELOPER
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Note The SQL*Plus variable that holds the name of the external editor is _editor, with a leading underscore in its name.
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You can invoke the external editor to change the contents of the SQL buffer. For this purpose, the SQL*Plus command is EDIT. You can invoke the external editor only when your SQL buffer is not empty. An empty buffer results in the error message nothing to save. Invoking the external editor starts a subprocess, which means that you cannot return to SQL*Plus until you have closed the external editor window. Alternatively, you may want to start a separate editor session from the operating system (that is, not from SQL*Plus) so you can switch between two windows. In that case, you must make sure to save the changes in your editor window before executing the changed SQL command in SQL*Plus.
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Using the SQL*Plus Editor
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Learning to use the SQL*Plus editing commands is key to being more proficient and efficient in scripting. Instead of starting over if you make a mistake entering a statement, you can make a quick edit and then execute the statement. The editing commands are the same in all versions of SQL*Plus on all platforms. To explore the SQL*Plus editor, we begin with the same simple SQL SELECT command in the SQL buffer (from the Entering Commands section earlier in the chapter): SQL> select * 2 from employees;
Note Please follow all instructions in this section verbatim, even when you think there are some mistakes, because any mistakes are intentional.
It is important to realize that the SQL*Plus editor is line-oriented; that is, there is only one current line at any point in time. You can make changes only to that current line. (Perhaps you remember the good old EDLIN editor under MS-DOS ) SQL*Plus marks the current line on screen with an asterisk (*) after the line number. Normally, it is the line you entered last; in our example, it is the second line. If you want to change something on the first line, you must first activate that line with the L1 command. Let s try to change the asterisk into two column names. C is an abbreviation for the SQL*Plus command CHANGE. Listing 2-5 shows how to use the LIST and CHANGE commands to make this change. SQL*Plus searches the current line for the first occurrence of an asterisk (*) and changes that character into eename, bdate.
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