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VARCHAR2 (25) CHAR (4) CLOB
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Alphanumeric, variable length, up to 25 characters Alphanumeric, fixed length, four characters Alphanumeric, larger than the maximum size of the VARCHAR2 datatype
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Table 3-3 lists the maximum size values for the datatypes mentioned so far.
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Note The actual units of measure used for the size of CHAR and VARCHAR2 datatypes depend on character semantics (bytes or characters). See 7 for details.
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Table 3-3. Maximum Datatype Sizes
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Datatype
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NUMBER CHAR VARCHAR2 CLOB
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38 digits precision 2000 4000 4GB
Note The indicated maximum CLOB size (4GB) is not completely correct. Depending on some configuration parameters, CLOB columns may contain much more than 4GB worth of data. Refer to Oracle SQL Reference for details.
DATA DEFINITION, PART I
The basic datatype for time-related data is DATE. By default, date values are interpreted and displayed according to a standard date format, typically showing only the day, the month, and the last two digits of the year. You can change the default date format for your session or use conversion functions in your SQL commands to display dates in different ways. Internally, Oracle stores dates in such a way that DATE column values are allowed from the year 4712 BC until the year 9999. Oracle dates are internally stored with much more precision than you might expect on first consideration.
Caution DATE columns also contain a time indication (hours, minutes, and seconds), which may cause problems when comparing two dates. For example, seemingly equal dates could be different due to their invisible time components.
Apart from the DATE datatype, Oracle also supports the related datatypes TIMESTAMP (with or without TIME ZONE) and INTERVAL to store other time-related data in table columns. 7 provides more details on the time-related datatypes. This book focuses on the usage of the three standard Oracle datatypes: NUMBER, VARCHAR2, and DATE.
3.4 Commands for Creating the Case Tables
This section lists the SQL commands to create the seven case tables introduced in 1, as an illustration of the concepts covered in the previous three sections, without much additional explanation. Since the BOOK schema consists of seven tables, this section also shows seven CREATE TABLE commands, presented in Listings 3-1 through 3-7.
Note As mentioned earlier, constraint definition (and constraint checking) is not taken into consideration in this chapter; therefore, the following listings do not show the complete commands to create the case tables.
Listing 3-1. The EMPLOYEES Table create table ( empno , ename , init , job , mgr , bdate , msal , comm , deptno EMPLOYEES number(4) varchar2(8) varchar2(5) varchar2(8) number(4) date number(6,2) number(6,2) number(2) not null not null not null not null not null
DATA DEFINITION, PART I
Listing 3-2. The DEPARTMENTS Table create table ( deptno , dname , location , mgr DEPARTMENTS number(2) not null varchar2(10) not null varchar2(8) not null number(4) );
Listing 3-3. The SALGRADES Table create table ( grade , lowerlimit , upperlimit , bonus SALGRADES number(2) number(6,2) number(6,2) number(6,2) not not not not null null null null );
Listing 3-4. The COURSES Table create table ( code , description , category , duration COURSES varchar2(6) varchar2(30) char(3) number(2) not not not not null null null null );
Listing 3-5. The OFFERINGS Table create table ( course , begindate , trainer , location OFFERINGS varchar2(6) date number(4) varchar2(8) not null not null );
Listing 3-6. The REGISTRATIONS Table create table ( attendee , course , begindate , evaluation REGISTRATIONS number(4) not null varchar2(6) not null date not null number(1) );
Listing 3-7. The HISTORY Table create table ( empno , beginyear , begindate , enddate , deptno , msal , comments HISTORY number(4) number(4) date date number(2) number(6,2) varchar2(60) not null not null not null not null not null );
DATA DEFINITION, PART I
3.5 The Data Dictionary
If you are interested in knowing which tables are present in your database, which columns they have, whether or not those columns are indexed, which privileges are granted to you, and similar information, you should query the data dictionary. Another common term for data dictionary is catalog. By the way, we already queried the data dictionary implicitly before, in 2, when using the SQL*Plus DESCRIBE command; this command queries the data dictionary under the hood. The data dictionary is more or less the internal housekeeping administration of Oracle. The data dictionary stores information about the data, also referred to as metadata. The data dictionary is automatically maintained by Oracle; therefore, the data dictionary is always up-to-date. DBMSs - like Oracle - store data dictionary data in precisely the same way as they store regular data: in tables. This is in compliance with Ted Codd s rule 4 (see 1). The big advantage of this approach is that you can use the SQL language to query data dictionary data in the same way that you query ordinary data. In other words, if you master the SQL language, you need to know only the names of the data dictionary tables and the names of their columns. Data dictionary access is a potential security risk. That s why the Oracle DBMS offers system privileges and roles to regulate and protect access to the data dictionary. For example, there is a role SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE, which contains all privileges that you need to be able to access the data dictionary data. Listing 3-8 demonstrates how Oracle controls data dictionary access. The listing was generated from SQL*Plus. Listing 3-8. Needing the SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE Role SQL> describe dba_sys_privs ERROR: ORA-04043: object "SYS"."DBA_SYS_PRIVS" does not exist SQL> connect / as sysdba Connected. SQL> grant select_catalog_role to book; Grant succeeded. SQL> connect book/book Connected. SQL> desc dba_sys_privs Name ----------------------------GRANTEE PRIVILEGE ADMIN_OPTION SQL> Although the information is stored in data dictionary tables, most of the time, you access data dictionary views instead. On the other hand, views are tables anyway. See 10 for details about views. Null -------NOT NULL NOT NULL Type --------------VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(40) VARCHAR2(3)
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