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Java class files are designed to be independent units that contain all the necessary elements to run without making assumptions about the availability of class-specific resources. As a result, each class file contains its own symbol table as well as method, field, and exception tables and some other information. The encapsulation of these elements also makes Java class files easy to extend at runtime. However, this flexibility comes with the cost of supporting redundant information structures. If a set of class files were to be delivered as a unit unto themselves, much of these redundancies could be removed, making for a much smaller application size. This possibility is desirable in the CLDC space due to bandwidth limitations. Additionally, such a format could also allow applications to be executed in-place without the need for a loading process, making for a similar application runtime model that could improve performance. The creators of the CLDC recognize this opportunity and this capability may find its way into the CLDC on a future version.
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Debug support Sun Microsystems has developed a number of debugging architectures and interfaces that are compatible with Java Virtual Machines. The Java Debug Wire Protocol (JDWP) is an interface that allows any JVM to be plugged into development and debugging environments. The Java Platform Debugging Architecture (JPDA) supports the infrastructure for building JVM-compatible debugging tools. Communication between the development environment and the virtual machine using the JDWP is typically done using sockets. Due to memory restrictions, the KVM does not fully support the Java Debug Wire Protocol. Instead, a subset of the JDWP is supported by an interface named the KVM Debug Wire Protocol (KDWP).
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By supporting the KDWP, a development environment equipped with a JPDAcompliant debugger can interface to the KVM debug features through a proxy. This proxy issues debug commands to the KVM and interfaces with the KVM to retrieve debug data values. The proxy is invisible to the development environment. To the development environment, it looks like the debugger is communicating with a fully compliant implementation of the Java Debug Wire Protocol interface.
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The CVM is designed for devices that have more resources available and are not as constrained as CLDC devices. The CDC runtime environment is a superset of the CLDC runtime environment and provides full support for the Java Virtual Machine Specification as well as the Java Language Specification. The C-Virtual Machine (CVM) is the reference virtual machine implementation for the CDC environment. This virtual machine is based on the J2SE and PersonalJava virtual machines; however, the CVM is more modular and easier to extend than the J2SE and PersonalJava virtual machines. Since the CVM is a fully compliant virtual machine, its lifecycle is identical to the J2SE virtual machine. Unlike the CLDC virtual machines, class file verification is handled entirely on the device. As with the KVM, the CVM is a reference implementation virtual machine. Device manufacturers can choose to port the CVM or build their own virtual machine from the ground up. The key design features for the CVM are as follows: Designed for devices with at least 512 KB of ROM and 256 KB RAM. However, most devices in this space support at least 2 megabytes of total memory available for the CVM and the CDC libraries. Full-featured virtual machine that completely supports the Java Virtual Machine Specification and the Java Language Specification. Runs on 32-bit processors Supports network connectivity Based on the Personal Java Virtual Machine and the J2SE Virtual Machine; however, the CVM is designed to be more modular and extendible. Targets communicator class devices such as pocket PCs, PDAs, smart phones, small retail payment terminals and Internet appliances.
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Garbage collection and the CVM The CVM does not implement garbage collection directly but rather provides an interface so that garbage collection can be plugged into the virtual machine independently without needing to modify the virtual machine source code. The CVM is carefully designed to separate the virtual machine s operational code from the memory management code. The default garbage collector that ships with the CVM is designed to be as precise as possible. The collector employs the concept of exactness in order to precisely understand all pointer information during garbage collection passes. Exactness uses fewer handles per object, allows for full compacting of the heap during each collection pass, reduces the amount of guess work in collecting objects and allows for more garbage collection algorithm options. Exactness is implemented by requiring all threads to manage themselves between two states, gc-safe and gc-unsafe. By default, threads operate in the gc-unsafe state a majority of the time. While in this state, objects may operate on and within the heap and perform gc-unsafe operations. However, each thread is required to periodically place itself into a gc-safe state in order for the garbage collector to perform collection operations. When a thread becomes gc-safe, it must make all of its pointers explicitly known to the garbage collector. The garbage collector can only execute if all threads are in a gc-safe state. This requires the CVM to bring all threads in the system to a gc-safe state before allowing the garbage collector to proceed. As each thread becomes gc-safe, the thread suspends itself and makes all of its pointers available. The interpreter contains what are called gc-safe points in order to allow garbage collection to take place periodically. The gc-safe points are implemented periodically within the interpreter instruction set. Specifically, the interpreter implements gc-safe points when methods are invoked, on returns from method calls, memory allocation points and class loading and constant resolution points. By implementing gc-safe points within the interpreter, the system is guaranteed to become gc-safe within discrete periods of time. Memory references in the CVM The CVM uses a method of pointer indirection to perform pointer accounting tasks and to ensure no pointers become invisible to the garbage collector. There are two interfaces supported by the CVM. The direct memory interface provides direct access to the heap. Primarily the virtual machine interpreter uses this interface. Accessing pointers through the direct memory interface is always gc-unsafe. The second interface is the indirect memory interface. This method of accessing the heap is always gc-safe. Code running outside of the virtual machine interpreter should always use the indirect memory interface. Class loading and the JNI are examples that would use the indirect memory interface.
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