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DEVELOPING A J2ME APPLICATION
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After completing each of the tasks described previously there is a working tutorial application. Therefore, if you would like to skip ahead and look at a particular section of interest, each chapter uses the work from the previous chapter, but it can be worked on and examined as an independent entity without difficulty. The steps of the tutorial application s development are covered in the chapters as outlined in table 3.3.
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Table 3.2 The next two sections of this book are organized around teaching and demonstrating the MIDP and KJava APIs. Part 2 Developing for cellular phones and pagers 4 A simple MIDP application 5 MIDP user interface 6 MIDP data storage 7 Connecting to the Internet Part 3 Developing for PDAs 8 J2ME on a PDA, a KJava introduction 9 KJava user interface 10 KJava data storage
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* Note the networking service is also reused and connected in the KJava version of the application in chapter 10.
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SUMMARY
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In this chapter, we examined our hypothetical customer and defined the requirements for our tutorial application. Based on the requirements, we established a general system design outlining the major components of the system. With the major features of the application laid out, we are ready to implement our application. As we will see, each API may require certain changes in implementation based on the capabilities of the underlying platform. These will be specifically evident in the user interface and database arenas, as intended by the J2ME configuration/profile architecture. In the end, however, we will have at least two different devices with the same applications outlined in this chapter.
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Developing for cellular phones and pagers
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n this part, we explore the CLDC and MIDP APIs in some detail. As you may recall from chapter 2, the CLDC and MIDP are guided by J2ME specifications. We will demonstrate the APIs in a tutorial application which was initially described in chapter 3. The tutorial application allows a customer to use a cell phone or two-way pager to get and see stock or mutual fund quotes. This tutorial application will allow us to see the major aspects of a J2ME application, namely user interface, event handling, data storage, input/output and network connectivity.
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A simple MIDP application
4.1 Questions about the MIDP development environment 56 4.2 Developing MIDP applications 56 4.3 Summary 68
This chapter introduces you to the entire process of creating a J2ME application using the Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP). In order to illustrate this example a simple application will be used. In doing this, we introduce a number of J2ME terms and concepts, and provide a cursory introduction to the J2ME API. It s always a good idea to become familiar with some of the terminology and the paradigm of a new software environment before trying to tackle a big project. This will set the stage for upcoming chapters where each concept will be covered in more detail and we look at using J2ME to build our tutorial application. For now, the goal is to get an application up and running quickly and to introduce you to the MIDP development environment. All of the examples are described using the Windows operating system. We do not address the particular syntax of other operating system commands, but the general concepts hold. If you are not running Windows, you will need to translate the commands appropriately.
QUESTIONS ABOUT THE MIDP DEVELOPMENT
ENVIRONMENT
When starting out in any new application development environment, most people usually have a number of general questions about the environment and tools for doing the job. Let s see if we can head off a few of these before we get started.
Can I do this without an actual device Absolutely! Many emulators are freely available and allow you to run and test J2ME applications right on your desktop. We will discuss how to obtain and use each type of emulator when the time is right. But first we will concentrate on the code. What device do I start with The Mobile Information Device Profile has been designed mainly with cellular phones and pagers in mind. However, MIDP can run on other types of devices, such as PDAs. Sun currently has an implementation of MIDP that runs on Palm OS devices. However, the current MIDP user interface capabilities are rather limiting on a PDA. For this example, a cellular phone will be chosen as the primary target device for the application. Since we are developing to the MIDP, rather than a specific device, the application will run on any MIDP-compliant device. So at this point, all we need to be concerned about is that the desired target devices support MIDP. Do I have to use the command line tools No, there are a number of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) available that take care of the dirty work for you. Sun s Wireless Toolkit is a good example. However, this chapter is intended to give you a detailed, behind-the-scenes example of what goes into creating a J2ME application. Therefore we will use the command line tools provided by Sun s reference implementations. We hope this will give you a better understanding of the technology. The example: what are we going to do This chapter uses a variation of the ubiquitous Hello World application. The application is rather simple in functionality; it just displays a string of text to the screen. However, the intent of this chapter is to quickly cover the lifecycle of developing a complete application and deploying it to a device. More sophisticated applications will be built in later chapters.
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