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Performance Considerations
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The developer community actively debates the performance of exception handling. My experience is that the benefit of exception handling far outweighs any performance penalties. In this section, I ll address some of the performance issues related to exception handling. It s difficult to compare performance between exception handling and the more conventional means of reporting exceptions (HRESULTs, special return codes, and so forth). If you write code to check the return value of every method call and filter the return value up to your own callers, your application s performance will be seriously affected. But performance aside, the amount of additional coding you must do and the potential for mistakes is incredibly high. Exception handling is a much better alternative.
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Unmanaged C++ compilers must generate code that tracks which objects have been constructed successfully. The compiler must also generate code that, when an exception is caught, calls the destructor for each of the successfully constructed objects. It s great that the compiler takes on this burden, but it generates a lot of bookkeeping code in your application, adversely affecting code size and execution time. On the other hand, managed compilers have it much easier because managed objects are allocated in the managed heap, which is monitored by the garbage collector (GC). If an object is successfully constructed and an exception is thrown, the GC will eventually deallocate the object. Compilers don t need to emit any bookkeeping code to track which objects are constructed successfully and to ensure that a destructor is called (especially because managed objects are destroyed at a nondeterministic time). Compared to unmanaged C++, this means that less code is generated by the compiler and less code has to execute at run time: your application s performance is better. Over the years, I ve used exception handling in different languages, different operating systems, and different CPU architectures. In each case, exception handling is implemented differently. Each implementation has its pros and cons with respect to performance. Some implementations compile exception handling constructs directly into a method, while other implementations store information related to exception handling in a data table associated with the method this table is accessed only if an exception is thrown. Some compilers can t inline methods that contain exception handlers, and some compilers won t enregister variables if the method contains exception handlers. The point is that you can t determine how much additional overhead using exception handling adds to an application. In the managed world, it s even more difficult to tell because your assembly s code can run on any platform that supports the .NET Framework. So the code produced by the JIT compiler to manage exception handling when your assembly is running on an x86 machine will be very different than the code produced by the JIT compiler when your code is running on an IA64 processor or the code produced by the .NET Compact Framework s JIT compiler. Actually, I ve been able to test some of my own code with a few different JIT compilers that Microsoft has internally, and the difference in performance that I ve observed has been quite dramatic and surprising. The point is that you must test your code on the various platforms that you expect your users to run on and make changes accordingly. Again, I wouldn t worry about the performance of using exception handling; as I ve said, the benefits far outweigh any negative performance impact. If you re interested in seeing how exception handling impacts the performance of your code, you can use PerfMon.exe or the System Monitor ActiveX control that comes with Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and the Windows .NET Server product family. The screen in Figure 18 1 shows the exception related counters that get installed when the .NET Framework is installed.
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Figure 18 1 : PerfMon.exe showing the .NET CLR exception counters Here s what each counter means: # Of Exceps Thrown Displays the total number of exceptions thrown since the application started. These include both .NET exceptions and unmanaged exceptions that get converted into .NET exceptions. For example, a null pointer reference exception in unmanaged code w o u l d g e t r e t h r o w n i n m a n a g e d c o d e a s a . N E T System.NullReferenceException exception; this counter includes both handled and unhandled exceptions. Exceptions that are rethrown would get counted again. # Of Exceps Thrown/Sec Displays the number of exceptions thrown per second. These include both .NET exceptions and unmanaged exceptions that get converted into .NET exceptions. For example, a null pointer reference exception in unmanaged code would get re thrown in managed code as a .NET System.NullReferenceException exception; this counter includes both handled and unhandled exceptions. This counter was designed as an indicator of potential performance problems caused by a large (>100s) number of exceptions being thrown. This counter isn t an average over time; rather, it displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples divided by the duration of the sample interval. # Of Filters/Sec Displays the number of .NET exception filters executed per second. An exception filter evaluates whether or not an exception should be handled. This counter tracks the rate of exception filters evaluated, regardless of whether or not the exception was handled. As with the preceding counter, this counter isn t an average over time; rather, it displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples divided by the duration of the sample interval.
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# Of Finallys/Sec Displays the number of finally blocks executed per second. A finally block is guaranteed to be executed regardless of how the try block was exited. Only the finally blocks that are executed for an exception are counted; this counter doesn t count finally blocks on normal code paths. Again, this counter isn t an average over time; it displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples divided by the duration of the sample interval. Throw To Catch Depth/Sec Displays the number of stack frames traversed from the frame that threw the .NET exception to the frame that handled the exception per second. This counter resets to 0 when an exception handler is entered, so nested exceptions would show the handler to handler stack depth. Again, this counter isn t an average over time; it displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples divided by the duration of the sample interval.
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