code 39 vb.net Large Objects in Visual Studio .NET

Draw USS Code 39 in Visual Studio .NET Large Objects

Large Objects
Draw USS Code 39 In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
There is one more performance improvement that you might want to be aware of. Any objects that are 85,000 bytes or more in size are considered to be large objects. Large objects are allocated from a special large object heap. Objects in this heap are finalized and freed just like the small objects I ve been talking about. However, large objects are never compacted because it would waste too much CPU time shifting 85,000 byte blocks of memory down in the heap. Large objects are always considered part of generation 2, so you should create large objects only for resources that you need to keep alive for a long time. Allocating short lived large objects will cause generation 2 to be collected more frequently, which will hurt performance. All of these mechanisms are transparent to your application code. To you, the developer, it appears as if there is just one managed heap; these mechanisms exist simply to improve application performance.
Create Code 3/9 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code-39 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing USS Code 39 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Monitoring Garbage Collections
Generating USS Code 39 In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When you install the .NET Framework, it installs a set of performance counters that offer a lot of real time statistics about the CLR s operations. These statistics are visible via the PerfMon.exe tool or the System Monitor ActiveX control that ships with Windows. The easiest way to access the System Monitor control is to run PerfMon.exe and select the + toolbar button, which causes the Add Counters dialog box shown in Figure 19 6 to appear.
Create Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw Code 128 Code Set A In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 19 16 : PerfMon.exe showing the .NET CLR memory counters To monitor the CLR s garbage collector, select the .NET CLR Memory performance object. Then select a specific application from the instance list box. Finally, select the set of counters that you re interested in monitoring and press the Add button followed by the Close button. At this point, the System Monitor will graph the selected real time statistics. For an explanation of a particular counter, select the desired counter and press the Explain button.
UPC-A Supplement 5 Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
USS Code 39 Encoder In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code-39 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
20: CLR Hosting, AppDomains, and Reflection
QR Code Printer In .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
USD-4 Encoder In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Rationalized Codabar image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
In this chapter, I ll discuss three main topics that really show off the incredible value provided by the Microsoft .NET Framework. In particular, I ll explain how many of Microsoft s existing application and server products intend to leverage the common language runtime (CLR) in the future. You ll see that your investment in learning the .NET Framework today will certainly pay off down the line. I ll also talk about AppDomains, a mechanism offered by the CLR to reduce memory usage and improve system performance. And finally, I ll discuss reflection, a mechanism that allows you to design dynamically extensible applications that your types or another party s types can easily enhance.
Encode Code 128 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Android Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint PDF-417 2d Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Metadata: The Cornerstone of the .NET Framework
Bar Code Printer In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code128 Recognizer In VB.NET
Using Barcode reader for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
By now, it should be obvious to you that metadata is the cornerstone technology of the .NET Framework development platform. Metadata describes a type s fields along with its methods. Metadata is what allows a type developed in one programming language to be consumed by code developed in a completely different programming language. In addition, the garbage collector uses metadata to determine what objects are reachable; the metadata indicates what other objects an object can refer to. Development tools, such as Microsoft Visual Studio s editor, use metadata to provide IntelliSense and other help related assistance. And, of course, metadata is used to serialize and deserialize objects so that they can be persisted to disk or sent over the network. In fact, this ability to use metadata to easily serialize and deserialize objects over the wire is what makes building XML Web services with the .NET Framework child s play. Throughout this book, I ve been using the ILDasm.exe tool that ships with the .NET Framework SDK. This tool parses the metadata contained inside a managed module or assembly and shows the metadata information in human readable format. The act of examining metadata is called reflection; in other words, ILDasm.exe reflects over the module s or assembly s metadata and shows the results to the user. Reflection is an incredibly powerful tool for developers. Reflection allows developers to build dynamically extensible applications. For example, anyone can produce a type and package it in an assembly. However, if that type follows certain rules, the Visual Studio .NET Windows Forms and Web Forms designers can integrate the type (component) into the designers. Visual Studio can add the type to the Toolbox window, and when an instance of the type is dropped on a form, the Properties window will show the properties that are exposed by the type. This rich level of integration and the ease with which it s produced are unparalleled in earlier technologies such as Win32 and COM. In this chapter, I ll demonstrate how to use reflection to accomplish this level of integration. A method can use reflection to alter its behavior based on facts learned about another piece of code. You saw an example of this in 13. If an enumerated type has an instance of the System.FlagsAttribute applied to it, then calling ToString on an instance of the enumerated type causes the value to be treated as a bit flag instead of a single numeric value. In fact, reflection is really what custom attributes are all about. Using reflection, a method can alter its behavior based on its caller. For example, it s possible to implement a method that performs a certain operation when called from code in the same assembly. The same method could perform slightly different operations when called from code 392
Code 128 Code Set C Recognizer In .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create GS1 DataBar In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar Expanded image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
outside the assembly. The possibilities are endless. Before getting too deep into reflection, you need to become familiar with CLR hosting and AppDomains. So I ll spend some time addressing these topics before delving back into reflection to explain how all this fits together.
Data Matrix Encoder In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF 417 Decoder In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.