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CLR method headers : 24 Num.of method bodies 2 Num.of fat headers 2 Num.of tiny headers 0 Managed code : 18 Ave method size 9
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Here you can see the size (in bytes) of the file and the size (in bytes and percentages) of the various parts that make up the file. For this very small App.cs application, the PE header and the metadata occupy the bulk of the file s size. In fact, the IL code occupies just 18 bytes. Of course, as an application grows, it will reuse most of its types and references to other types and assemblies, causing the metadata and header information to shrink considerably as compared to the overall size of the file.
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Combining Modules to Form an Assembly
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The App.exe file discussed in the previous section is more than just a PE file with metadata; it is also an assembly. An assembly is a collection of one or more files containing type definitions and resource files. One of the assembly s files is chosen to hold a manifest. The manifest is another set of metadata tables that basically contain the name of the files that are part of the assembly. They also describe the assembly s version, culture, publisher, publicly exported types, and all the files that comprise the assembly. The CLR operates on assemblies; that is, the CLR always loads the file that contains the manifest 47
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metadata tables first and then uses the manifest to get the names of the other files that are in the assembly. Here are some characteristics of assemblies that you should remember: An assembly defines the reusable types. An assembly is marked with a version number. An assembly can have security information associated with it. An assembly s individual files don t have these attributes except for the file that contains the manifest metadata tables. To package, version, secure, and use types, you must place them in modules that are part of an assembly. In most cases, an assembly consists of a single file, as the preceding App.exe example does. However, an assembly can also consist of multiple files: some PE files with metadata and some resource files such as .gif or .jpg files. It might help you to think of an assembly as a logical EXE or a DLL. I m sure that many of you reading this are wondering why Microsoft has introduced this new assembly concept. The reason is that an assembly allows you to decouple the logical and physical notions of reusable types. For example, an assembly can consist of several types. You could put the frequently used types in one file and the less frequently used types in another file. If your assembly is deployed by downloading it via the Internet, the file with the infrequently used types might not ever have to be downloaded to the client if the client never accesses the types. For example, an ISV specializing in UI controls might choose to implement Active Accessibility types in a separate module (to satisfy Microsoft s Logo requirements). Only users who require the additional accessibility features would require that this module be downloaded. You configure an application to download assembly files by specifying a codeBase element (discussed in 3) in the application s configuration file. The codeBase element identifies a URL where all of an assembly s files can be found. When attempting to load an assembly s file, the CLR obtains the codeBase element s URL and checks the machine s download cache to see if the file is present. If it is, the file is loaded. If the file isn t in the cache, the CLR downloads the file from the URL into the cache. If the file can t be found, the CLR throws a FileNotFoundException exception at runtime. I ve identified three reasons to use multifile assemblies: You can partition your types among separate files, allowing for files to be incrementally downloaded as described in the Internet download scenario. Partitioning the types into separate files also allows for partial or piecemeal packaging and deployment for shrink wrapped scenarios. You can add resource or data files to your assembly. For example, you could have a type that calculates some insurance information. This type might require access to some actuarial tables to make its computations. Instead of embedding the actuarial tables in your source code, you could use a tool (such as the assembly linker (AL.exe), discussed later) so that the data file is considered to be part of the assembly. By the way, this data file can be in any format: a text file, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, a Microsoft Word table, or whatever you like as long as your application knows how to parse the file s contents. You can create assemblies consisting of types implemented in different programming languages. When you compile C# source code, the compiler produces a module. When you compile Visual Basic source code, the compiler produces a separate module. You can implement some types in C#, some types in Visual Basic, and other types in other languages. You can then use a tool to combine all these modules into a single assembly. To 48
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developers using the assembly, the assembly just contains a bunch of types; developers won t even know that different programming languages were used. By the way, if you prefer, you can run ILDasm.exe on each of the modules to obtain an IL source code file. Then you can run ILAsm.exe and pass it all the IL source code files. ILAsm.exe will produce a single file containing all the types. This technique requires that your source code compiler produces IL only code, so you can t use this technique with Visual C++, for example. Important To summarize, an assembly is a unit of reuse, versioning, and security. It allows you to partition your types and resources into separate files so that you and consumers of your assembly get to determine which files to package together and deploy. Once the CLR loads the file containing the manifest, it can determine which of the assembly s other files contain the types and resources that the application is referencing. Anyone consuming the assembly is required to know only the name of the file containing the manifest; the file partitioning is then abstracted away from the consumer and may change in the future without breaking the application s behavior. To build an assembly, you must select one of your PE files to be the keeper of the manifest. Or you can create a separate PE file that contains nothing but the manifest. Table 2 3 shows the manifest metadata tables that turn a managed module into an assembly. Table 2 3: Manifest Metadata Tables Manifest Metadata Table Name AssemblyDef Description Contains a single entry if this module identifies an assembly. The entry includes the assembly s name (without path and extension), version (major, minor, build, and revision), culture, flags, hash algorithm, and the publisher s public key (which can be null). Contains one entry for each PE and resource file that is part of the assembly. The entry includes the file s name and extension (without path), hash value, and flags. If this assembly consists only of its own file, the FileDef table has no entries. Contains one entry for each resource that is part of the assembly. The entry includes the resource s name, flags (public, private), and an index into the FileDef table indicating the file that contains the resource file or stream. If the resource isn t a stand alone file (such as .jpeg or a .gif), the resource is a stream contained within a PE file. For an embedded resource, the entry also includes an offset indicating the start of the resource stream within the PE file. Contains one entry for each public type exported from all the assembly s PE modules. The entry includes the type s name, an index into the FileDef table (indicating which of this assembly s files implements the type), and an index into the TypeDef table. Note: To save file space, types 49
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