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Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks
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Whether or not you think about it consciously, you probably accept fundamental assumptions about communication that literally shape your thinking in ways large and small. If you commonly talk about communication in terms of a sender who transmits a message to a receiver, you might assume that you can send information through an unobstructed channel, like a pipeline, and the audience will get it, fully intact, at the other end of the pipeline, as shown in Figure 2-3.
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the pipeline
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FIGURE 2-3 The pipeline concept assumes that there is an unobstructed channel between you and your
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audience.
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With the pipeline in mind, you assume that you can produce a PowerPoint presentation in whatever way you like, as shown on the left in Figure 2-4. After you send this PowerPoint presentation through the pipeline, you assume that its receivers will get it on the other side, as shown on the right. Your work is then done. The only criterion for success is that you delivered the PowerPoint presentation through the pipeline. If for some reason the audience didn t get what you delivered, of course, it s not your fault as a presenter after all, you delivered the PowerPoint presentation, and what they did with it is their problem, not yours. The pipeline assumption is at work when people make statements like, We showed them the facts, but they just didn t get it, or, The presentation went right over their heads. When a verdict in a legal trial goes against one party, it is common for people to say the jury just didn t get the evidence, or when a sales presentation does not succeed, the presenter might say the audience just didn t get the bene ts of the product or service. It is hard to separate the pipeline metaphor from our thinking because it is woven into the words and expressions we use commonly every day.
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Trick 1: Use Slide Sorter View to Manage the Volume
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What you present to your audience
What you assume the audience learns
FIGURE 2-4 With the pipeline in mind, you assume that your audience will get whatever you deliver to
them.
Although the pipeline metaphor is convenient, in practice it does not deliver what you might assume it does. According to leading educational psychologist Richard E. Mayer, if you give a multimedia presentation to an audience, there are three possible outcomes, as shown in Figure 2-5. The rst possible outcome is that your audience experienced no learning (upper right). This is the worst-case scenario in spite of your work in preparing your presentation and your audience s time and effort in showing up and paying attention, no learning happened to make the experience worthwhile.
What actually happens What you present to your audience No learning
Fragmented learning
Meaningful learning
FIGURE 2-5 In reality, audiences do not automatically get what you send through the pipeline.
A second possible outcome is that your audience remembered perhaps the bullet points on slides 12 and 33 and the diagram on slide 26 but that s all they remembered. In this scenario, they remember only bits and pieces of the presentation because they experienced fragmented learning (middle right). In fragmented learning, the audience members
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Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks
remember at least some things; but from a presenter s perspective, you have no control over what they learned because the fragments could be any pieces of information among many, and you don t know which ones. The third possible outcome is that the audience remembered exactly what the presenter intended they experienced meaningful learning (lower right). Meaningful learning is what any group wants to achieve in their time together the people in the audience understand what the presenter intended, and they are able to apply the information after the meeting. Audiences routinely report that PowerPoint presentations today are Forgettable! and What s the point It s rare to hear an audience and a presenter agree that meaningful learning has occurred. In order to turn the situation around, you literally need to change the shape of the metaphor that guides the way you think about human communication. During a PowerPoint presentation, the memory of an audience member is the critical human element that determines how well new information is received, processed, and stored in the human mind. Researchers who study the mind generally accept that there are three types of human memory, as shown in Figure 2-6. The rst type is sensory memory. Sensory memory is the part of the mind where your audience members brie y store the initial impressions of sights and sounds as they look at and listen to the environment around them. Sensory memory is potentially unlimited in capacity, although sights and sounds might persist in sensory memory for less than a second.
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