c# make barcode Trick 1: Use Slide Sorter View to Manage the Volume in Visual Basic .NET

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Trick 1: Use Slide Sorter View to Manage the Volume
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FIGURE 2-8 When you show more information than working memory can handle, audience members
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remember only bits and pieces.
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The impact of reducing excess load on working memory has been documented by researchers including Mayer, who conducted a study using two multimedia presentations. The rst presentation featured interesting but irrelevant graphics, and the second presentation provided the same information, but without the interesting but irrelevant graphics. Mayer measured the impact of the two approaches on audiences in terms of two criteria: retention, the ability of the audience to simply recall the information, and transfer, the ability to creatively apply the new information. Audiences who experienced the second presentation retained 69 percent more information and were able to apply 105 percent more creative solutions using the information than those who experienced the rst presentation. This study offers research-based evidence to support the saying Less is more the less you overload working memory with extraneous information, the more learning improves.
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BBP Respects the Limits of Working Memory
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With the eye of the needle metaphor in mind, take a look at how a BBP presentation appears in Slide Sorter view, as shown in Figure 2-9. Studies have found that people learn better when information is broken up into digestible pieces, and here in Slide Sorter view, you can literally see each speci c digestible piece in the form of a single slide that contains only one main idea that is clearly summarized by a headline. This eases your audience through your story and explanation frame by frame, one piece at a time.
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A familiar motif relates new information to existing information in long-term memory.
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Information is presented in bite-sized segments, with one idea per slide.
There is clear guidance to help the viewer build a coherent structure. Slide layouts and backgrounds call attention to the most important slides first.
FIGURE 2-9 Slide Sorter view shows a presentation that is broken up into digestible chunks for easier han-
dling by working memory.
In the Slide Sorter view of a BBP presentation, your eye immediately goes to the most important slides because you use layouts and backgrounds to cue your audience to where they are. This approach draws from the hard work you do when you distill your complex ideas to the essence and identify your key points, as you ll see in 5. These visual cues also indicate the sections of the presentation that explain your key points, explanation, and backup detail. In s 6, 7, and 8, you ll use consistent layouts and backgrounds within the individual sections of a presentation to create visual and verbal continuity, but when you reach a new section of the presentation, the layouts and backgrounds will change. This orients both presenter and audience to where they are in the story, and the changing slide layouts and backgrounds offer your audience visual variety to keep their interest. You can also see from Slide Sorter view that BBP uses a visual motif through a presentation. Researchers have found that you can improve the ability of working memory to process new information by applying familiar organizing structures. This works because an important quality of working memory is that it is a two-way street. Although
Trick 1: Use Slide Sorter View to Manage the Volume
2
working memory has only limited capacity to handle new information as that information arrives, as shown on the left in Figure 2-10, it also has unlimited capacity to pull in existing information from long-term memory, as shown on the right.
New Information
Existing Information
FIGURE 2-10 Working memory is limited in its capacity to process new information (left), but it is
unlimited in its capacity to process existing information from long-term memory (right).
This plays out in the classic test of working memory, when a researcher presents someone with new information in the form of a series of unrelated numbers, such as 1 2 1 5 1 5 2 3 5 4. The number of these individual chunks of information that someone can recall is considered the capacity of that person s working memory. However, people can remember more of the same set of numbers when working memory pulls from long-term memory a structure they already know. This organizes the new information into meaningful chunks that hold the same information in a more memorable way, such as 212-555-1234 the familiar structure of a U.S. telephone number. Thus a chunk is de ned by the audience as they apply a meaningful structure from their long-term memory to new information. You help your audience accelerate understanding of new information with BBP by introducing a familiar chunking structure to new information you present. For example, in s 4 and 5, you choose a familiar motif that resonates with your audience, and then later in s 7 and 8, you extend the motif visually across the slides. See Also For more information about using familiar structures to overcome the limited capacity of working memory to process new information, see John Sweller, Implications of Cognitive Load for Multimedia Learning, in The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, Richard E. Mayer, Ed., pp. 19 30 (Cambridge University Press, 2005).
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