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and full load tests on a regular basis, and should also call for periodically replacing the fuel to the generator if it s gasoline powered. One of the best ways to do all of this is to plan and execute a disaster day for testing your entire disaster recovery plan in as close to real-world conditions as possible, including running your entire operation from the backup generator.
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The most common computer hardware malfunction is probably a hard disk failure. Even though hard disks have become more reliable over time, they are still subject to failure, especially during their rst month or so of use. They are also vulnerable to both catastrophic and degenerative failures caused by power problems. Fortunately, disk arrays have become the norm for servers, and good fault-tolerant RAID systems are available in Windows Small Business Server 2008 and RAID-speci c hardware supported by SBS. The choice of software or hardware RAID, and the particulars of how you con gure your RAID system, can signi cantly affect the cost of your servers. To make an informed choice for your environment and needs, you must understand the tradeoffs and the differences in fault tolerance, speed, con gurability, and so on.
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RAID can be implemented at the hardware level, using RAID controllers, or at the software level, either by the operating system or by a third-party add-on. SBS supports both hardware RAID and its own software RAID. Hardware RAID implementations require dedicated controllers and cost somewhat more than an equivalent level of software RAID. However, for that extra price, you get a faster, more exible, and more fault-tolerant RAID. When compared to the software RAID provided in SBS 2008, a good hardware RAID controller supports more levels of RAID, on-the- y recon guration of the arrays, hot-swap and hot-spare drives (discussed later in this chapter), and dedicated caching of both reads and writes. Software RAID requires that you convert your disks to dynamic disks. Converting your boot disk (C drive) is probably not a good idea. Dynamic disks can be more dif cult to access if a problem occurs, and the SBS setup and installation program provides only limited support. For maximum fault tolerance, we recommend using hardware mirroring (RAID 1) on your system drive; if you do use software mirroring, make sure your disaster recovery scenarios fully encompass booting from the second disk of a failed mirror. Or just say no to having your boot disk as part of a software RAID array.
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Except for level 0, RAID is a mechanism for storing suf cient information on a group of hard disks so that even if one hard disk in the group fails, no information is lost. Some RAID arrangements go even further, providing protection in the event of multiple hard disk failures. The more common levels of RAID and their appropriateness in a fault-tolerant environment are shown in Table 4-1.
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TABLE 4-1 RAID Levels and Their Fault Tolerance
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LEVEL 0
NUMBER OF DISKS* N
SPEED +++
FAULT TOLERANCE ---
DESCRIPTION Striping alone. Not fault-tolerant it actually increases your risk of failure but does provide for the fastest read and write performance. Mirror or duplex. Slightly faster read than single disk, but no gain during write operations. Failure of any single disk causes no loss in data and minimal performance hit. Byte-level parity. Data is striped across multiple drives at the byte level with the parity information written to a single dedicated drive. Reads are much faster than with a single disk, but writes operate slightly slower than a single disk because parity information must be generated and written to a single disk. Failure of any single disk causes no loss of data but can cause a signi cant loss of performance. Block-level parity with a dedicated parity disk. Similar to RAID 3 except that data is striped at the block level. Interleaved block-level parity. Parity information is distributed across all drives. Reads are much faster than a single disk but writes are signi cantly slower. Failure of any single disk provides no loss of data but results in a major reduction in performance.
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