asp net qr code library Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol in VS .NET

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Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
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A DHCP server automatically provides IP addresses to DHCP clients from the range or ranges of available addresses you determine. You can also configure a DHCP server to
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Lesson 2
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Understanding IP Addressing
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assign clients automatically with other options, such as the addresses of DNS and WINS servers, gateway addresses, and other parameters. DHCP is covered in more detail in 7, Configuring DHCP Servers and Clients, and 8, Monitoring and Troubleshooting DHCP.
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Automatic Private IP Addressing
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APIPA is an automatic addressing feature used for simple networks lacking a DHCP server and consisting of a single network segment. APIPA is discussed in more detail in 1, Understanding Windows Server 2003 Networks.
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Alternate Configuration
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Like APIPA, an alternate configuration provides an IP address for computers unable to find a DHCP server. However, when you specify an alternate configuration on a given computer, that computer defaults (in the absence of a DHCP server) to the manually configured alternate address instead of an APIPA address. This feature is useful when the computer is used on more than one network and when one of the networks does not have a DHCP server. For example, suppose you use your laptop computer both at the office and at home. The same network adapter is used for both networks, and you configure the local area connection to obtain an IP address automatically. With this simple configuration, the laptop acquires a DHCP-allocated TCP/IP configuration at the office. At home, where you have no DHCP server, the laptop adopts the alternate configuration you have defined, including an IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway appropriate for the home network.
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Understanding the Structure of IP Addresses
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People usually recognize IP addresses by their distinctive sequence of four numbers separated by dots, such as 192.168.100.22. However, this version of an IP address is really just a transcription called dotted-decimal notation that people use to remem ber the address easily. Whereas decimal notation is the 10-digit numbering system that most people use every day, computer processing is based on binary notation, which uses only the digits 1 and 0 to represent all values. The native form of an IP address is thus binary. The logic behind IP addressing is revealed when you look at this native binary version of IP addresses. To be able to configure, manage, and troubleshoot IP addressing, therefore, you must be able to understand and work with the binary form of IP addresses, as well as translate between binary and decimal notations.
2-10
2
Understanding TCP/IP
Real World
Manually Converting Binary and Decimal Notations
In the age of computers and scientific calculators, making manual conversions between binary and decimal notation might seem like an outmoded and unnec essarily tedious means of solving an arithmetic problem. Truth be told, network administrators on the job rarely need to make such conversions, and when they do, administrators are far more likely to rush to a calculator for help than to a pencil and paper. Even during the certification exam, you can avoid performing manual conversions because at many test centers a scientific calculator is built into the exam interface. (All test centers include at least a non-scientific calculator.) So, you might ask, why not simply rely on calculators to perform decimal binary conversions and avoid performing these operations by hand The short answer is that by learning to perform these calculations by hand, you will visualize IP addresses more clearly and therefore be able to spot and repair IP configuration problems more easily. This skill is especially important for subnetted networks, in which IP address schemes can appear confusing. Regardless of this practical benefit, performing manual conversions between the dotted-decimal and binary notation of an IP address is simply a skill expected of a good network administrator, the same way a modern accountant who relies on accounting software for everyday calculations is still expected to be able to perform long division. If that analogy doesn t provide ample motivation, just think that learning to perform these operations by hand gives you a backup method of performing conversions when a scientific calculator is unavailable, as well as an always-available means to flaunt esoteric knowledge and impress your coworkers.
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