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This section discusses statements not related to selection, iteration, and the transfer of processing control. The try and fixed statements are listed here for completeness; a detailed description of each statement is included in 6.
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The try Statement
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See "Exceptions and Exception Handling" in 6 for details of the try statement.
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The lock Statement
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The C# keyword lock is nearly equivalent to the Java keyword synchronized. The principle difference is that the lock keyword cannot be used as a modifier to synchronize access to an entire method. It's applicable only to statement blocks, as in the following example:
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public void SampleMethod() { lock(SomeObject) { // statements needing synchronized access } return; }
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Use of the lock statement is covered in detail in 13.
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4. Language Syntax and Features
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The checked and unchecked Keywords
Arithmetic overflow occurs when the result of an integer type mathematical operation or conversion is greater or smaller than can be represented by the defined data type. For example, in Java and C#, a short can contain integer values between -32,768 and 32,767. The following code demonstrates arithmetic overflow in Java:
short x = 32767; x++; System.out.println(x);
The output from the above code will be -32768. Java handles integral arithmetic overflow by truncating the high-order bits, resulting in the cyclical effect just demonstrated. In C#, the checked and unchecked keywords allow control of the compile-time and run-time handling of integral arithmetic overflow. Technically, the checked and unchecked keywords are operators as well as statements. The checked and unchecked keywords use the same syntax. An example of a checked expression and statement is included in the following code fragment:
// A checked expression int b = checked (x * 5); // A checked statement block checked { int p = x++; int q = x * 5; int r = p * q; }
A compiler error is reported if the value of the checked expression can be resolved at compile time and overflow occurs. If the value of the checked expression cannot be determined until run time, overflow causes a System.OverflowException to be thrown. The use of the unchecked keyword forces truncation, causing any errors or exceptions to be suppressed and resulting in the same cyclic behavior seen with Java. If neither checked nor unchecked is specified in the code, the following defaults are used:
For constant values, the compiler checks for overflow and an error will be reported, as though the checked keyword had been specified. For variable values, the runtime will allow truncated values, as though the unchecked keyword had been specified.
The default compile-time overflow checking can be modified by using the /checked compiler flag. See 3 for details of compiler flags.
The using Statement
The using keyword represents both a statement and a directive. The using directive is for importing namespaces into an application. See the "Namespaces" section earlier in this
4. Language Syntax and Features
chapter for details. The using statement is a mechanism for efficiently acquiring, using, and disposing of a class or struct that implements the System.IDisposable interface. For example, if MyClass and MyStruct are types that implement IDisposable, the syntax of the using command is as follows:
using (MyClass x = new MyClass(), MyStruct y = new MyStruct()) { // do something with x and y x.someMethod(); y.someOtherMethod(); } // x and y are automatically disposed of
The objects specified in the using statement are available within the scope of the statement block. At the end of the statement block, the Dispose method of the IDisposable interface is automatically called on each object. The using statement automatically wraps the necessary try catch finally structure around the statement block. This ensures that the objects are disposed of irrespective of whether an exception causes the program to leave the statement block or the statement exits normally.
The fixed Statement
For information on the fixed statement, see the "Unsafe Code" section in 6.
Summary
This chapter has described the fundamentals of the C# language, comparing and contrasting them with the Java language. We have shown that great similarities exist between C# and Java but that there are also occasional, often subtle differences of which the Java programmer must be wary. We have also introduced a number of new features that a Java programmer must become familiar with in order to become proficient with C#.
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