code 39 barcode vb.net Unary Operator Return Types in Visual Basic .NET

Creating Code 128 in Visual Basic .NET Unary Operator Return Types

Table 5-19. Unary Operator Return Types
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Operator +, -, !, ~ ++, -true, false
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Return Type Any The type containing the operator member bool
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The following example demonstrates the syntax used to declare a variety of unary operators as members of a class named SomeClass. We have highlighted the operator keywords and tokens for clarity.
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public class SomeClass { // +, -, !, and ~ operators can return any type public static int operator +(SomeClass x) {/* */} public static SomeOtherClass operator ~(SomeClass x) {/* */} // ++ and - operators must return an instance of SomeClass public static SomeClass operator ++(SomeClass x) {/* */} // true and false operators must be declared as a pair // and return bool public static bool operator true(SomeClass x) {/* */} public static bool operator false(SomeClass x) {/* */} }
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Given the declaration of SomeClass, the following statements are valid:
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5. Data Types SomeClass x = new SomeClass(); SomeClass y = +x; SomeOtherClass z = ~x; while (x) { x++; } // Instantiate a new SomeClass // Unary + operator // Bitwise compliment operator // true operator // postfix increment operator
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Binary operators
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Binary operator members allow the following operators to be overloaded: +, -, *, /, %, &, |, ^, <<, >>, ==, !=, >, <, >=, and <=. The following binary operators must be overloaded in pairs:
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== and != > and < >= and <=
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Binary operator declarations must specify two arguments, one of which must be the type that the operator member is declared in. The order of the arguments must match the order of operands when the overloaded operator is used. The return value can be of any type. Paired operator declarations must have the same argument types and order. When a binary operator is overloaded, the corresponding compound assignment operator (if any) is implicitly overloaded. For example, overloading the * operator implicitly overloads the *= operator. If a type overloads the == or != operator, a compiler warning is generated if the type does not override the inherited Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode methods. Although the && and || operators cannot be directly overloaded, they are supported through the implementation of the & and | operators. Using the && operator as an example, the & operator must be overloaded, taking two arguments of the type in which the operator member is declared and returning the same type. The following example demonstrates a number of binary operator member declarations as members of a struct named SomeStruct. We have highlighted the operator keywords and tokens for clarity.
public struct SomeStruct { // The // The public public == and != operators must be declared in pairs same arguments types and order must be used static bool operator == (SomeStruct x, int y) {/* */} static bool operator != (SomeStruct x, int y) {/* */}
// Binary + operator causes += to be implicitly overloaded public static SomeStruct operator + (SomeStruct x, long y) {/* */} // Binary & operator declared to support usage with "&&" statements public static SomeStruct operator & ( SomeStruct x, SomeStruct y) {/* */} }
5. Data Types
Given the declaration of SomeStruct, the following code fragments are valid:
SomeStruct x = new SomeStruct(); SomeStruct y = new SomeStruct(); if (x && y) { x += 45 ; } // Instantiate a new SomeStruct // Instantiate a new SomeStruct
// correctly implemented "&" operator supports this // implicitly provided by overloading "+" operator
Conversion operators
Conversion operator members allow the programmer to define the logic used to convert an instance of one type (the source) to an instance of another (the target). The compiler will use available conversion operators to perform implicit and explicit data type conversions. See the "Types" section earlier in this chapter for details of implicit and explicit conversions. Conversion operator declarations include the keyword implicit or explicit. This determines where the compiler will use the conversion operator. Conversion operator members take a single parameter and return a value of any type. The parameter is the source type and the return value is the target type of the conversion. For example, the declaration of an implicit conversion operator to convert a string to an instance of SomeClass is as follows:
public static implicit operator SomeClass(String x) {/* */}
The declaration of an explicit conversion operator to convert an instance of SomeStruct to an int is as follows:
public static explicit operator int (SomeStruct x) {/* */}
The following restrictions apply to conversion operators:
Either the return type or the argument must be the type in which the conversion operator is declared. It is not possible to declare a conversion operator to redefine an already existing conversion, meaning that it is not possible to define both an explicit and an implicit conversion operator for the same types. A conversion operator must convert between different types. Conversion to or from interface types is not possible. No inheritance relationship can exist between the target and source types.
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