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In spite of the obvious need for configuration management, many programmers have been avoiding it for decades. A survey more than 20 years ago found that over a third of programmers weren t even familiar with the idea (Beck and Perkins 1983), and there s little indication that that has changed. A more recent study by the Software Engineering Institute found that, of organizations using informal software development practices, less than 20% had adequate configuration management (SEI 2003). Configuration management wasn t invented by programmers. But because programming projects are so volatile, it s especially useful to programmers. Applied to software projects, configuration management is usually called software configuration management, or SCM (commonly pronounced scum ). SCM focuses on a program s source code, documentation, and test data. The systemic problem with SCM is overcontrol. The surest way to stop auto accidents is to prevent everyone from driving, and one sure way to prevent software-development problems is to stop all software development. Although that s one way to control changes, it s a terrible way to develop software. You have to plan SCM carefully so that it s an asset rather than an albatross around your neck.
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For details on the effects of project size on construction, see 27, How Program Size Affects Construction.
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On a small 1-person project, you can probably do well with no SCM beyond planning for informal periodic backups. Nonetheless, configuration management is still useful (and, in fact, I used configuration management in creating this manuscript). On a large 50-person project, you ll probably need a full-blown SCM scheme including fairly formal procedures for backups, change control for requirements and design, and control over documents, source code, content, test cases, and other project artifacts. If your project is neither very large nor very small, you ll have to settle on a degree of formality somewhere between the two extremes. The following subsections describe some of the options in implementing SCM.
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2 e development approaches
support changes better than others. For details, see 4 Section 3.2, Determine the 5 Kind of Software You re Working On.
During development, you re bound to be bristling with ideas about how to improve the system. If you implement each change as it occurs to you, you ll soon find yourself walking on a software treadmill for all that the system will be changing, it won t be moving closer to completion. Here are some guidelines for controlling design changes:
Follow a systematic change-control procedure As Section 3.4 noted, a systematic change-control procedure is a godsend when you have a lot of change requests. By establishing a systematic procedure, you
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make it clear that changes will be considered in the context of what s best for the project overall.
Handle change requests in groups It s tempting to implement easy changes as ideas arise. The problem with handling changes in this way is that good changes can get lost. If you think of a simple change 25 percent of the way through the project and you re on schedule, you ll make the change. If you think of another simple change 50 percent of the way through the project and you re already behind, you won t. When you start to run out of time at the end of the project, it won t matter that the second change is 10 times as good as the first you won t be in a position to make any nonessential changes. Some of the best changes can slip through the cracks merely because you thought of them later rather than sooner.
The informal solution to this problem is to write down all ideas and suggestions, no matter how easy they would be to implement, and save them until you have time to work on them. Then, viewing them as a group, choose the ones that will be the most beneficial.
Estimate the cost of each change Whenever your customer, your boss, or you are tempted to change the system, estimate the time it would take to make the change, including review of the code for the change and retesting the whole system. Include in your estimate time for dealing with the change s ripple effect through requirements to design to code to test to changes in the user documentation. Let all the interested parties know that software is intricately interwoven and that time estimation is necessary even if the change appears small at first glance.
Regardless of how optimistic you feel when the change is first suggested, refrain from giving an off-the-cuff estimate. Hand waving estimates are often mistaken by a factor of 2 or more.
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