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Phased Integration
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Incremental Integration
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Figure 29-4 In phased integration, you integrate so many components at once that it s hard to know where the error is. It might be in any of the components or in any of their connections. In incremental integration, the error is usually either in the new component or in the connection between the new component and the system.
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The system succeeds early in the project When code is integrated and running, even if the system isn t usable, it s apparent that it soon will be. With incremental integration, programmers see early results from their work, so their morale is better than when they suspect that their project will never draw its first breath. You get improved progress monitoring When you integrate frequently, the features that are present and not present are obvious. Management will have a better sense of progress from seeing 50 percent of a system s capability working than from hearing that coding is 99 percent complete.
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29. Integration
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You ll improve customer relations If frequent integration has an effect on developer morale, it also has an effect on customer morale. Customers like signs of progress, and incremental builds provide signs of progress frequently. The units of the system are tested more fully Integration starts early in the project. You integrate each class as it s developed, rather than waiting for one magnificent binge of integration at the end. Classes are developer tested in both cases, but each class is exercised as a part of the overall system more often with incremental integration than it is with phased integration. You can build the system with a shorter development schedule If integration is planned carefully, you can design part of the system while another part is being coded. This doesn t reduce the total number of work-hours required to develop the complete design and code, but it allows some work to be done in parallel, an advantage when calendar time is at a premium.
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Incremental integration supports and encourages other incremental strategies. The advantages of incrementalism applied to integration are the tip of the iceberg.
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29.3 Incremental Integration Strategies
With phased integration, you don t have to plan the order in which project components are built. All components are integrated at the same time, so you can build them in any order as long as they re all ready by D-day. With incremental integration, you have to plan more carefully. Most systems will call for the integration of some components before the integration of others. Planning for integration thus affects planning for construction; the order in which components are constructed has to support the order in which they will be integrated. Integration-order strategies come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and none is best in every case. The best integration approach varies from project to project, and the best solution is always the one that you create to meet the specific demands of a specific project. Knowing the points on the methodological number line will give you insight into the possible solutions.
Top-Down Integration
In top-down integration, the class at the top of the hierarchy is written and integrated first. The top is the main window, the applications control loop, the
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29. Integration
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object that contains main() in Java, WinMain() for Microsoft Windows programming, or similar. Stubs have to be written to exercise the top class. Then, as classes are integrated from the top down, stub classes are replaced with real ones. Here s how this kind of integration proceeds:
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Figure 29-5 In top-down integration, you add classes at the top first, at the bottom last.
An important aspect of top-down integration is that the interfaces between classes must be carefully specified. The most troublesome errors to debug are not the ones that affect single classes but those that arise from subtle interactions between classes. Careful interface specification can reduce the problem. Interface specification isn t an integration activity, but making sure that the interfaces have been specified well is. In addition to the advantages you get from any kind of incremental integration, an advantage of top-down integration is that the control logic of the system is tested relatively early. All the classes at the top of the hierarchy are exercised a lot, so that big, conceptual, design problems are exposed quickly. Another advantage of top-down integration is that, if you plan it carefully, you can complete a partially working system early in the project. If the user-interface parts are at the top, you can get a basic interface working quickly and flesh out the details later. The morale of both users and programmers benefits from getting something visible working early. Top-down incremental integration also allows you to begin coding before the low-level design details are complete. Once the design has been driven down to a fairly low level of detail in all areas, you can begin implementing and integrating the classes at the higher levels without waiting to dot every i and cross every t. In spite of these advantages, pure top-down integration usually involves disadvantages that are more troublesome than you ll want to put up with.
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