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12. Fundamental Data Types
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Use enumerated types for modifiability Enumerated types make your code easy to modify. If you discover a flaw in your 1 stands for red, 2 stands for green, 3 stands for blue scheme, you have to go through your code and change all the 1s, 2s, 3s, and so on. If you use an enumerated type, you can continue adding elements to the list just by putting them into the type definition and recompiling. Use enumerated types as an alternative to boolean variables Often, a boolean variable isn t rich enough to express the meanings it needs to. For example, suppose you have a routine return True if it has successfully performed its task and False otherwise. Later you might find that you really have two kinds of False. The first kind means that the task failed, and the effects are limited to the routine itself; the second kind means that the task failed, and caused a fatal error that will need to be propagated to the rest of the program. In this case, an enumerated type with the values Status_Success, Status_Warning, and Status_FatalError would be more useful than a boolean with the values True and False. This scheme can easily be expanded to handle additional distinctions in the kinds of success or failure. Check for invalid values When you test an enumerated type in an if or case statement, check for invalid values. Use the else clause in a case statement to trap invalid values:
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Good Visual Basic Example of Checking for Invalid Values in an Enumerated Type
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Select Case screenColor Case Color_Red ... Case Color_Blue ... Case Color_Green ... Case Else DisplayInternalError( False, "Internal Error 752: Invalid color." ) End Select
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2 Here s the test for the invalid value.
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Define the first and last entries of an enumeration for use as loop limits Defining the first and last elements in an enumeration to be Color_First, Color_Last, Country_First, Country_Last, and so on allows you to write a loop that loops through the elements of an enumeration. You set up the enumerated type using explicit values, as shown below:
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Visual Basic Example of Setting First and Last Values in an Enumerated Type
Public Enum Country Country_First = 0 Country_China = 0 Country_England = 1 Country_France = 2 Country_Germany = 3 Country_India = 4 Country_Japan = 5 Country_Usa = 6 Country_Last = 6 End Enum
Now the Country_First and Country_Last values can be used as loop limits, as shown below:
Good Visual Basic Example of Looping Through Elements in an Enumeration
' compute currency conversions from US currency to target currency Dim usaCurrencyConversionRate( Country_Last ) As Single Dim iCountry As Country For iCountry = Country_First To Country_Last usaCurrencyConversionRate( iCountry ) = ConversionRate( Country_Usa, iCountry ) Next
Reserve the first entry in the enumerated type as invalid When you declare an enumerated type, reserve the first value as an invalid value. Examples of this were shown earlier in the Visual Basic declarations of Color, Country, and Output types. Many compilers assign the first element in an enumerated type to the value 0. Declaring the element that s mapped to 0 to be invalid helps to catch variables that were not properly initialized since they are more likely to be 0 than any other invalid value.
Here is how the Country declaration would look with that approach:
Visual Basic Example of Declaring the First Value in an Enumeration to be Invalid
Public Enum Country Country_InvalidFirst = 0 Country_First = 1 Country_China = 1 Country_England = 2 Country_France = 3 Country_Germany = 4
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Country_India = 5 Country_Japan = 6 Country_Usa = 7 Country_Last = 7 End Enum
Define precisely how First and Last elements are to be used in the project coding standard, and use them consistently Using InvalidFirst, First, and Last elements in enumerations can make array declarations and loops more readable. But it has the potential to create confusion about whether the valid entries in the enumeration begin at 0 or 1 and whether the first and last elements of the enumeration are valid. If this technique is used, the project s coding standard should require that InvalidFirst, First, and Last elements be used consistently in all enumerations to reduce errors. Beware of pitfalls of assigning explicit values to elements of an enumeration Some languages allow you to assign specific values to elements within an enumeration, as shown in the C++ example below:
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