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5 d routine names are key to
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routine documentation. For details on how to create them, 7 see Section 7.3, "Good 8 Routine Names."
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Describe each routine in one or two sentences at the top of the routine If you can t describe the routine in a short sentence or two, you probably need to think harder about what it s supposed to do. Difficulty in creating a short description is a sign that the design isn t as good as it should be. Go back to the design drawing board and try again. The short summary statement should be present in virtually all routines except for simple Get and Set accessor routines.
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32. Self-Documenting Code
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Document parameters where they are declared The easiest way to document input and output variables is to put comments next to the parameter declarations. Here s an example:
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public void InsertionSort( int[] dataToSort, // elements to sort in locations firstElement..lastElement int firstElement, // index of first element to sort (>=0) int lastElement // index of last element to sort (<= MAX_ELEMENTS) )
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Endl ine comments are discussed in more detail in Endline comments and their problems, earlier in this section.
This practice is a good exception to the rule of not using endline comments; they are exceptionally useful in documenting input and output parameters. This occasion for commenting is also a good illustration of the value of using standard indentation rather than endline indentation for routine parameter lists; you wouldn t have room for meaningful endline comments if you used endline indentation. The comments in the example are strained for space even with standard indentation. This example also demonstrates that comments aren t the only form of documentation. If your variable names are good enough, you might be able to skip commenting them. Finally, the need to document input and output variables is a good reason to avoid global data. Where do you document it Presumably, you document the globals in the monster prolog. That makes for more work and unfortunately in practice usually means that the global data doesn t get documented. That s too bad because global data needs to be documented at least as much as anything else.
Differentiate between input and output data It s useful to know which data is used as input and which is used as output. Visual Basic makes it relatively easy to tell because output data is preceded by the ByRef keyword and input data is preceded by the ByVal keyword. If your language doesn t support such differentiation automatically, put it into comments. Here s an example in C++:
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32. Self-Documenting Code
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The order of these parameters follows the standard order for C++ routines but conflicts with more general practices. For details, see "Put parameters in input-modifyoutput order" in Section 7.5. For details on using a naming convention to differentiate between input and output data, see Section 11.4, "Informal Naming Conventions."
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C++ Example of Differentiating Between Input and Output Data
void StringCopy( char *target, char *source ) ... // out: string to copy to // in: string to copy from
C++-language routine declarations are a little tricky because some of the time the asterisk (*) indicates that the argument is an output argument, and a lot of the time it just means that the variable is easier to handle as a pointer than as a base type. You re usually better off identifying input and output arguments explicitly. If your routines are short enough and you maintain a clear distinction between input and output data, documenting the data s input or output status is probably unnecessary. If the routine is longer, however, it s a useful service to anyone who reads the routine.
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For details on other considerations for routine interfaces, see Section 7.5, "How to Use Routine Parameters."
Document interface assumptions Documenting interface assumptions might be viewed as a subset of the other commenting recommendations. If you have made any assumptions about the state of variables you receive legal and illegal values, arrays being in sorted order, member data being initialized or containing only good data, and so on document them either in the routine prolog or where the data is declared. This documentation should be present in virtually every routine.
Make sure that global data that s used is documented. A global variable is as much an interface to a routine as anything else and is all the more hazardous because it sometimes doesn t seem like one. As you re writing the routine and realize that you re making an interface assumption, write it down immediately.
Comment on the routine s limitations If the routine provides a numeric result, indicate the accuracy of the result. If the computations are undefined under some conditions, document the conditions. If the routine has a default behavior when it gets into trouble, document the behavior. If the routine is expected to work only on arrays or tables of a certain size, indicate that. If you know of modifications to the program that would break the routine, document them. If you ran into gotchas during the development of the routine, document them too. Document the routine s global effects If the routine modifies global data, describe exactly what it does to the global data. As mentioned in Section 13.3, modifying global data is at least an order of magnitude more dangerous than merely reading it, so modifications should be
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