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33. Personal Character
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You can t do anything about your intelligence, so the classical wisdom goes, but you can do something about your character. It turns out that character is the more decisive factor in the makeup of a superior programmer.
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33.2 Intelligence and Humility
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We become authorities and experts in the practical and scientific spheres by so many separate acts and hours of work. If a person keeps faithfully busy each hour of the working day, he can count on waking up some morning to find himself one of the competent ones of his generation. William James
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Intelligence doesn t seem like an aspect of personal character, and it isn t. Coincidentally, great intelligence is only loosely connected to being a good programmer. What You don t have to be superintelligent No, you don t. Nobody is really smart enough to program computers. Fully understanding an average program requires an almost limitless capacity to absorb details and an equal capacity to comprehend them all at the same time. The way you focus your intelligence is more important than how much intelligence you have. As 5 mentioned, at the 1972 Turing Award Lecture, Edsger Dijkstra delivered a paper titled The Humble Programmer. He argued that most of programming is an attempt to compensate for the strictly limited size of our skulls. The people who are best at programming are the people who realize how small their brains are. They are humble. The people who are the worst at programming are the people who refuse to accept the fact that their brains aren t equal to the task. Their egos keep them from being great programmers. The more you learn to compensate for your small brain, the better a programmer you ll be. The more humble you are, the faster you ll improve. The purpose of many good programming practices is to reduce the load on your gray cells. Here are a few examples: The point of decomposing a system is to make it simpler to understand. (See Section TBD for more details.) Conducting reviews, inspections, and tests is a way of compensating for anticipated human fallibilities. These review techniques originated as part of egoless programming (Weinberg 1998). If you never made mistakes, you wouldn t need to review your software. But you know that your intellectual capacity is limited, so you augment it with someone else s. Keeping routines short reduces the load on your brain. Writing programs in terms of the problem domain rather than in terms of low-level implementation-level details reduces your mental workload.
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33. Personal Character
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Page 4
Using conventions of all sorts frees your brain from the relatively mundane aspects of programming, which offer little payback.
You might think that the high road would be to develop better mental abilities so that you wouldn t need these programming crutches. You might think that a programmer who uses mental crutches is taking the low road. Empirically, however, it s been shown that humble programmers who compensate for their fallibilities write code that s easier for themselves and others to understand and that has fewer errors. The real low road is the road of errors and delayed schedules.
33.3 Curiosity
Once you admit that your brain is too small to understand most programs and you realize that effective programming is a search for ways to offset that fact, you begin a career-long search for ways to compensate. In the development of a superior programmer, curiosity about technical subjects must be a priority. The relevant technical information changes continually. Many web programmers have never had to program in Windows, and many Windows programmers never had to deal with DOS, or Unix, or punch cards. Specific features of the technical environment change every 5 to 10 years. If you aren t curious enough to keep up with the changes, you may find yourself down at the old-programmers home playing cards with T-Bone Rex and the Brontosaurus sisters. Programmers are so busy working they often don t have time to be curious about how they might do their jobs better. If this is true for you, you re not alone. The following subsections describe a few specific actions you can take to exercise your curiosity and make learning a priority.
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