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34. Themes in Software Craftsmanship
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spend 50 to 60 percent of their time trying to understand the code they have to maintain, and they appreciate the time you put into documenting it (Parikh and Zvegintzov 1983). Earlier chapters examined the techniques that help you achieve readability: good class, routine, and variable names, careful formatting, small routines, hiding complex boolean tests in boolean functions, assigning intermediate results to variables for clarity in complicated calculations, and so on. No individual application of a technique can make the difference between a readable program and an illegible one. But the accumulation of many small readability improvements will be significant. If you think you don t need to make your code readable because no one else ever looks at it, make sure you re not confusing cause and effect.
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34.4 Program Into Your Language, Not In It
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Don t limit your programming thinking only to the concepts that are supported automatically by your language. The best programmers think of what they want to do, and then they assess how to accomplish their objectives with the programming tools at their disposal. Should you use a class member routine that s inconsistent with the class s abstraction just because it s more convenient than using one that provides more consistency You should write code in a way that preserves the abstraction represented by the class s interface as much as possible. You don t need to use global data or gotos just because your language supports them. You can choose not to use those hazardous programming capabilities use programming conventions to make up for weaknesses of the language. The fact that your language has a try-catch structure doesn t automatically mean that exception handling is the best error-handling approach. Programming using the most obvious path amounts to programming in a language rather than programming into a language; it s the programmer s equivalent of, If Freddie jumped off a bridge, would you jump off a bridge too Think about your technical goals, then decide how best to accomplish those goals by programming into your language. Your language doesn t support assertions Write your own assert() routine. It might not function exactly the same as a built-in assert(), but you can still realize most of assert() s benefits by writing your own routine. Your language doesn t support enumerated types or named constants That s fine; you can define your own enumerations and named constants with a disciplined use of global variables supported by clear naming conventions.
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In extreme cases, especially in new-technology environments, your tools might be so primitive that you re forced to change your desired programming approach significantly. In such cases, you might have to balance your desire to program into the language with the accidental difficulties that are created when the language makes your desired approach too cumbersome. But in such cases, you will benefit even more from programming conventions that help you steer clear of those environments most hazardous features. In more typical cases, the gap between what you want to do and what your tools will readily support will require you to make only relatively minor concessions to your environment.
34.5 Focus Your Attention with the Help of Conventions
6 CROSS-REFERENCE
7 an analysis of the value of
conventions as they apply to program layout, see How Much Is Good Layout 9 Worth and Objectives of 0 Good Layout in Section 1 31.1.
A set of conventions is one of the intellectual tools used to manage complexity. Earlier chapters talk about specific conventions. This section lays out the benefits of conventions with many examples. Many of the details of programming are somewhat arbitrary. How many spaces do you indent a loop How do you format a comment How should you order class routines Most of the questions like these have several right answers. The specific way in which such a question is answered is less important than that it be answered consistently each time. Conventions save programmers the trouble of answering the same questions making the same arbitrary decisions again and again. On projects with many programmers, using conventions prevents the confusion that results when different programmers make the arbitrary decisions differently. A convention conveys important information concisely. In naming conventions, a single character can differentiate among local, class, and global variables; capitalization can concisely differentiate among types, named constants, and variables. Indentation conventions can concisely show the logical structure of a program. Alignment conventions can indicate concisely that statements are related. Conventions protect against known hazards. You can establish conventions to eliminate the use of dangerous practices, to restrict such practices to cases in which they re needed, or to compensate for their known hazards. You could eliminate a dangerous practice, for example, by prohibiting global variables or prohibiting multiple statements on a line. You could compensate for a hazardous practice by requiring parentheses around complicated expressions or requiring pointers to be set to NULL immediately after they re deleted to help prevent dangling pointers.
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