C++ Example of Declaring a Loop-Index variable Within a for loop in C#

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C++ Example of Declaring a Loop-Index variable Within a for loop
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for ( int recordCount = 0; recordCount < MAX_RECORDS; recordCount++ ) { // looping code that uses recordCount }
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In principle, this technique should allow creation of code that redeclares recordCount in multiple loops without any risk of misusing the two different recordCounts. That usage would give rise to code that looks like this:
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C++ Example of Declaring Loop-Indexes Within for loops and reusing them safely Maybe!
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for ( int recordCount = 0; recordCount < MAX_RECORDS; recordCount++ ) { // looping code that uses recordCount } // intervening code for ( int recordCount = 0; recordCount < MAX_RECORDS; recordCount++ ) { // additional looping code that uses a different recordCount }
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16. Controlling Loops
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This technique is helpful for documenting the purpose of the recordCount variable, however don t rely on your compiler to enforce recordCount s scope. Section 6.3.3.1 of The C++ Programming Language (Stroustrup 1997) says that recordCount should have a scope limited to its loop. When I checked this functionality with three different C++ compilers, however, I got three different results: The first compiler flagged recordCount in the second for loop for multiple variable declarations and generated an error. The second compiler accepted recordCount in the second for loop but allowed it to be used outside the first for loop. The third compiler allowed both usages of recordCount and did not allow either one to be used outside the for loop in which it was declared.
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As is often the case with more esoteric language features, compiler implementations can vary.
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How Long Should a Loop Be
Loop length can be measured in lines of code or depth of nesting. Here are some guidelines:
Make your loops short enough to view all at once If you usually look at loops on 66-line paper, that puts a 66-line restriction on you. If your monitor displays 50 lines, that puts a 50-line restriction on you. Experts have suggested a loop-length limit of one printed page, or 66 lines. When you begin to appreciate the principle of writing simple code, however, you ll rarely write loops longer than 15 or 20 lines.
5 CROSS-REFERENCE
6 details on simplifying
nesting, see Section 19.4, Taming Dangerously Deep 8 Nesting.
Limit nesting to three levels Studies have shown that the ability of programmers to comprehend a loop deteriorates significantly beyond three levels of nesting (Yourdon 1986a). If you re going beyond that number of levels, make the loop shorter (conceptually) by breaking part of it into a routine or simplifying the control structure. Move loop innards of long loops into routines If the loop is well designed, the code on the inside of a loop can often be moved into one or more routines that are called from within the loop. Make long loops especially clear Length adds complexity. If you write a short loop, you can use riskier control structures such as break and continue, multiple exits, complicated termination conditions, and so on. If you write a longer loop and feel any concern for your
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16. Controlling Loops
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reader, you ll give the loop a single exit and make the exit condition unmistakably clear.
16.3 Creating Loops Easily from the Inside Out
If you sometimes have trouble coding a complex loop which most programmers do you can use a simple technique to get it right the first time. Here s the general process. Start with one case. Code that case with literals. Then indent it, put a loop around it, and replace the literals with loop indexes or computed expressions. Put another loop around that, if necessary, and replace more literals. Continue the process as long as you have to. When you finish, add all the necessary initializations. Since you start at the simple case and work outward to generalize it, you might think of this as coding from the inside out. Suppose you re writing a program for an insurance company. It has lifeinsurance rates that vary according to a person s age and sex. Your job is to write a routine that computes the total life-insurance premium for a group. You need a loop that takes the rate for each person in a list and adds it to a total. Here s how you d do it. First, in comments, write the steps the body of the loop needs to perform. It s easier to write down what needs to be done when you re not thinking about details of syntax, loop indexes, array indexes, and so on.
Step 1: Creating a Loop from the Inside Out (Pseudocode Example)
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