c# ean 13 generator KEY POINT in Visual C#.NET

Creating EAN-13 Supplement 5 in Visual C#.NET KEY POINT

7 KEY POINT
Making GS1 - 13 In C#
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Decoding EAN13 In C#
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When You Should Have a Naming Convention
Make Bar Code In Visual C#
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Reading Barcode In Visual C#
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
There are no hard-and-fast rules for when you should establish a naming convention, but here are a few cases in which conventions are worthwhile: When multiple programmers are working on a project When you plan to turn a program over to another programmer for modifications and maintenance (which is nearly always) When your programs are reviewed by other programmers in your organization When your program is so large that you can t hold the whole thing in your brain at once and must think about it in pieces When the program will be long-lived enough that you might put it aside for a few weeks or months before working on it again When you have a lot of unusual terms that are common on a project and want to have standard terms or abbreviations to use in coding
Make GTIN - 13 In .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode European Article Number 13 In .NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
5 KEY POINT
EAN 13 Encoder In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing PDF 417 In C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You always benefit from having some kind of naming convention. The considerations above should help you determine the extent of the convention to use on a particular project.
Encoding UPC-A Supplement 5 In C#
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting Data Matrix 2d Barcode In Visual C#
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Degrees of Formality
EAN / UCC - 13 Printer In C#
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
International Standard Book Number Creation In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Bookland EAN image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
9 CROSS-REFERENCE
UCC.EAN - 128 Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Word Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Microsoft Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Matrix Barcode Generator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
0 details on the differences in
PDF417 Encoder In None
Using Barcode encoder for Online Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode UPC-A Supplement 2 In None
Using Barcode printer for Online Control to generate, create UPC Code image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
formality in small and large projects, see 27, 2 How Program Size Affects 3 Construction.
Painting GTIN - 13 In Java
Using Barcode generation for Android Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UCC-128 Creation In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Different conventions have different degrees of formality. An informal convention might be as simple as the rule Use meaningful names. Somewhat more formal conventions are described in the next section. In general, the degree of formality you need is dependent on the number of people working on a program, the size of the program, and the program s expected life span. On tiny, throwaway projects, a strict convention might be unnecessary overhead. On larger projects in which several people are involved, either initially or over the program s life span, formal conventions are an indispensable aid to readability.
Creating UPC - 13 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR Code 2d Barcode Generation In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create QR-Code image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
de Complete
11. The Power of Variable Names
Page 15
11.4 Informal Naming Conventions
Most projects use relatively informal naming conventions such as the ones laid out in this section.
Guidelines for a Language-Independent Convention
Here are some guidelines for creating a language-independent convention:
Differentiate between variable names and routine names A convention associated with Java programming is to begin variable and object names with lower case and routine names with upper case: variableName vs. RoutineName(). Differentiate between classes and objects The correspondence between class names and object names or between types and variables of those types can get tricky. There are several standard options, as shown in the following examples:
Option 1: Differentiating Types and Variables via Initial Capitalization
Widget widget; LongerWidget longerWidget;
7 KEY POINT
Option 2: Differentiating Types and Variables via All Caps
WIDGET widget; LONGERWIDGET longerWidget
Option 3: Differentiating Types and Variables via the t_ Prefix for Types
t_Widget Widget; t_LongerWidget LongerWidget;
Option 4: Differentiating Types and Variables via the a Prefix for Variables
Widget aWidget; LongerWidget aLongerWidget;
Option 5: Differentiating Types and Variables via Using More Specific Names for the Variables
Widget employeeWidget; LongerWidget fullEmployeeWidget;
de Complete
11. The Power of Variable Names
Page 16
Each of these options has strengths and weaknesses. Option 1 is a common convention in case-sensitive languages including C++ and Java, but some programmers are uncomfortable differentiating names solely on the basis of capitalization. Indeed, creating names that differ only in the capitalization of the first letter in the name seems to provide too little psychological distance and too small a visual distinction between the two names. The Option 1 approach can t be applied consistently in mixed-language environments if any of the languages are case insensitive. In Visual Basic, for example,
Dim widget as Widget
will generate a syntax error, because widget and Widget are treated as the same token. Option 2 creates a more obvious distinction between the type name and the variable name. For historical reasons, all caps are used to indicate constants in C++ and Java, however, and the approach is subject to the same problems in work in mixed-language environments that Option 1 is subject to. Option 3 works adequately in all languages, but some programmers dislike the idea of prefixes for aesthetic reasons. Option 4 is sometimes used as an alternative to Option 3, but it has the drawback of altering the name of every instance of a class instead of just the one class name. Option 5 requires more thought on a variable-by-variable basis. In most instances, being forced to think of a specific name for a variable results in more readable code. But sometimes a widget truly is just a generic widget, and in those instances you ll find yourself coming up with less-than-obvious names, like genericWidget, which are arguably less readable. The code in this book uses Option 5 because it s the most understandable in situations in which the person reading the code isn t necessarily familiar with a less intuitive naming convention. In short, each of the available options involves tradeoffs. I tend to prefer Option 3 because it works across multiple languages, and I d rather have the odd prefix on the class name than on each and every object name. It s also easy to extend the convention consistently to named constants, enumerated types, and other kinds of types if desired.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.