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Elements of Dynamization
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I'll recap how these individual elements of the nesting are put together to give a complete formula, working from the inside out: Element 3:
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=COUNTIF($K$12:$K$23,"<>#N/A")
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In our example, this returns the value 10 . Element 2 with element 3 integrated:
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=INDEX($J$12:$J$23,COUNTIF($K$12:$K$23,"<>#N/A"),1)
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In our example, this returns the value October . Element 1 with elements 2 and 3 integrated:
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=LEFT(INDEX($J$12:$J$23,COUNTIF($K$12:$K$23,"<>#N/A"),1),3)
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In our example, this returns the value Oct . The complete formula is as follows:
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="Cumulation "&LEFT(INDEX($J$12:$J$23,COUNTIF($K$12:$K$23,"<>#N/A"),1),3)
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In our example, this returns the value Cumulation Oct . The following three aspects are also important in building this formula:
If you use names instead of the cell references $J$12:$J$23 and $K$12:$K$23, the formula becomes a little more unwieldy . We ll address this later in relation to variant 2 . The formula requires that the complete K12:K23 range is filled with values from top to bottom, which are then followed by #N/A values for the months for which indicators are not yet available . In the company in our example, the first indicator (Cash Ratio) is the most important because it is the most sensitive and must be examined more than once a month . If any of the indicators are going to be ready when needed, it s this one . The K12:K23 range therefore serves as a reference range to indicate how up-to-date the data is . This is in principle a failing in the solution, but one that s acceptable without difficulty .
I should also point out that, as is almost always the case in Excel, there were several other ways in which we could have accomplished this same task . If you're an experienced user, you can take this as a hint to experiment on your own . Let s turn now to the formulas in the K24:V24 range, which are used to calculate the average of the indicators to date . First, I ll briefly introduce another function that s needed here:
Variant 1 (Basic Model)
The =SUMIF(range,criteria,sum_range) function is the equivalent of COUNTIF and can be used in several different ways . It searches for criteria in range and, in the same or a parallel range (in sum_range, which may be any distance from the range), it adds together the contents of cells . The example shown in Figure 7-14 explains the principle much more effectively than a longer description that I could provide .
Figure 7-14 Syntax of the SUMIF function
What it essentially instructs Excel to do is as follows: In the D6:D15 range, add up the values of the cells whose neighboring cells in column F (range F6:F15) contain the search term from cell F3 (i .e ., A) . The variant used in the following example doesn t require the third formula argument (sum_range) because it adds values in the same range in which the search criteria are found .
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Elements of Dynamization
Figure 7-15 How to calculate averages within ranges containing numbers and #N/A Values
The AVERAGE Excel function calculates a value based on total divided by count . This wouldn t work in this case because the reference range of a corresponding formula (such as =AVERAGE(K12:K23)) contains #N/A values, and so the result of the formula would also be #N/A . What we need to do is keep the principle of total divided by count, but exclude the cells containing #N/A values from the calculation . One possible solution would be the following:
K24 =SUMIF(K$12:K$23,"<>#N/A")/COUNTIF(K$12:K$23,"<>#N/A")
This essentially instructs Excel to do the following: Add up the cells in the range K12:K23 that contain values other than #N/A, and divide the result by the number of cells in the range K12:K23 that contain values other than #N/A .
Formulas in the Basis 1 Worksheet
This worksheet provides the basis for the dynamic chart in the form of a table . The table is a variable collection of the data required to visualize the chart . It is based on formulas containing arguments that are partly determined by controls . This worksheet largely consists of formulas, with the relevant cells highlighted in color . The bright orange border around the K11:O23 cell range indicates the data basis of the chart . Roughly speaking, the task of the formulas can be classified as follows: if specific conditions are met, a certain type of data is to be read (extracted) from the Data 1 worksheet, and otherwise, not . Two functions are used to fulfill this task:
Variant 1 (Basic Model)
The =OFFSET(reference,rows,cols,height,width) function is explained in detail in 12, More Than Numbers . It returns the value located in a cell that is a certain number of rows and cols away from the reference . The reference argument thus defines the starting point for accessing another cell or cell range . The optional height and width arguments are not of relevance in this example . In its basic form, the much-used function =IF(logical_test,value_if_true,value_ if_false) returns the logical value TRUE or FALSE as the result of logical_test . In the logical_test part of the formula, you almost make a claim, and Excel then checks to see if this claim is true . If the result of logical_test = TRUE, Excel follows the instruction specified in the value_if_true part of the formula . If the result of logical_test = FALSE, Excel follows the instruction specified in the value_if_false part of the formula .
Note In some of the graphics below, traces of precedent cells are shown in relation to the display of formulas . These may explain why other cells (or their content) affect the result of the formula in the cell currently selected . The pertinent question becomes: Where are the values located that the formula in the selected cell requires in order to return a correct result If these supplier cells are located in the same worksheet, the traces in question are indicated with arrows and, in some cases, with borders . If they are located in another worksheet, a small table icon appears at the end of a dotted arrow line . If you double-click this line, the Go to dialog box opens . There you can see the cross-sheet reference, and you can specify whether you want to go to that worksheet for the purpose of verification .
The Trace Precedents tool is located in the Formula Auditing group of the Formulas tab in the Ribbon . The Trace Dependents command in the same group allows you to locate the cells that are affected by (i .e ., depend on) the value in the cell that is currently selected . The Remove Arrows command deletes the traces .
The formulas in cell L11 determine the label text of the indicator category configured by the user for use in the legend labels .
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