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You can ignore the Continue group in the lower right-hand corner. It's only important when you want different handling on breakpoint, single step, and invalid handle exceptions. If you add your own structured exception handling (SEH) errors to the list, leave the Continue option at the default, Not Handled. That way any time the exception comes through WinDBG, WinDBG will properly pass the exception directly back to the debuggee. You don't want the debugger eating exceptions other than those it caused, such as a breakpoint or a single step. After selecting a particular exception, the most important button on the dialog box is the Commands button. The name alone should give you a hint about what it does. Clicking on the Commands button brings up the Filter Command dialog box shown in Figure 8-6. The first edit control is misnamed and should be labeled First-Chance Exception.
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Figure 8-6: Filter Command dialog box In the Filter Command dialog box, you can enter WinDBG commands to execute when the debuggee generates a particular exception. When I discussed using the Visual Studio .NET Exception dialog box in the "Exception Monitoring" section of 7, I showed how you should set C++ exceptions to stop on the first chance exception so that you could monitor where your programs did the throws, and after pressing F10, the catch. The problem is that Visual Studio .NET stops each time a C++ exception occurs, so you have to sit there pressing F5 over and over when your application has numerous C++ throws. What's great about WinDBG and the ability to associate commands with the exceptions is that you can use a command to log out all the important information and, most usefully, continue execution so that you don't have to monitor the run. To set up C++ exception handling, select C++ EH Exception from the list of exceptions in the Event Filter dialog box and click the Commands button. In the Filter Command dialog box, enter kp;g in the Command edit box to have WinDBG log a stack walk and continue execution. Now you'll have a call stack each time a throw occurs, and WinDBG will keep right on executing. By 343
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the way, to see the last event or exception that occurred in a process, use the .LASTEVENT (Display Last Event) command. Controlling WinDBG Now that you've seen the important commands for debugging, I want to turn to a few meta commands that I haven't already covered. You can use these to control or make better use of WinDBG while debugging. Those I discuss are by no means a complete list of all the commands but rather a list of cool meta commands I use on a daily basis when debugging with WinDBG. The simplest but extremely useful command is .CLS (Clear Screen). This allows you to clear the Command window so that you can start fresh. Since WinDBG can spew a tremendous amount of information, which takes memory to store, it's good to clean the slate occasionally. If you're dealing with Unicode strings in your application, you'll want to set the display to show USHORT pointers as Unicode strings. The .ENABLE_UNICODE (Enable Unicode Display) command issued with a parameter of 1 will set everything up so that the DT command displays your strings correctly. If you'd like to set the locale so that Unicode strings display correctly, the .LOCALE (Set Locale) command takes the locale as a parameter. If you're dealing with bit manipulation and want to see the bit values, the .FORMATS (Show Number Formats) command will display the value passed as a parameter in all number formats, including binary. Another extremely useful command is .SHELL (Command Shell), which allows you to start up an MS-DOS window from the debugger and redirect output to the Command window. Debugging on the same machine the debuggee is running on and pressing Alt+Tab might be an easier approach, but the beauty of .SHELL is that when doing remote debugging, the MS-DOS window runs on the remote machine. You can also use the .SHELL command to run a single external program, redirecting output, and return to the Command window. After issuing a .SHELL command, the Command window input line says INPUT>, indicating that the MS-DOS window is waiting for input. To end the MS-DOS window and return to the Command window, use either the MS-DOS exit command or, more preferably, the .SHELL_QUIT (Quit Command Prompt) command because it will terminate the MS-DOS window even when the window is frozen. The final meta command I'll mention is one I've wanted in a debugger for years but has only now shown up. When writing error handling, you usually know that by the time you're executing the error handling, your process is in serious trouble. You also know 9 times out of 10 that if you hit a particular piece of error handling, you're probably going to look at specific variable values or the call stack, or will want to record specific information. What I've always wanted was a way to code the commands I would normally execute directly into my error handling. By doing that, the commands would execute, enabling the maintenance programmers and me to debug a problem faster. My idea was that since OutputDebugString calls go through the debugger, you could embed the commands into an OutputDebugString. You'd tell the debugger what to look for at the front of the OutputDebugString text, and anything after it would be the commands to execute. What I've just described is exactly how WinDBG's .OCOMMAND (Expect Commands from Target) command works. You call .OCOMMAND, identifying the string prefix to look for, at the front of any OutputDebugString calls. If the command is present, WinDBG will execute the rest of the text as a command string. Obviously, you'll want to be careful with the string you use or WinDBG could go nuts trying to execute OutputDebugString calls all through 344
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your programs. I like to use WINDBGCMD: as my string. I love this command and sprinkle WinDBG command strings all over my programs! When using .OCOMMAND, you need to follow the command string with a ";g" or WinDBG stops when the command ends. In the following function, I ensure that the commands all end with ";g" so that execution continues. To get the commands to execute, I issue a .ocommand WINDBGCMD: as the program starts. void Baz ( int ) { // To see the following convert into WinDBG commands, issue the // command ".ocommand WINDBGCMD:" inside WinDBG OutputDebugString WinDBG\";g" )); OutputDebugString done\";g")) ; } ( _T ( "WINDBGCMD: .echo \"Hello from
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