Integrating J2EE applications in Java

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Integrating J2EE applications
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Message level integration Message level integration is the most flexible and best performing of the system integration patterns. In this pattern, your application packages data into a request and transmits it over the network to the remote system asynchronously. The remote system unpackages the data and performs processing. This is depicted in figure 4.3. Because the interaction is asynchronous, your application does not wait for the remote system to process the message, resulting in better overall performance.
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Remote System
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Message level integration to a remote system
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In the reverse case, a remote system can generate messages and send them asynchronously to your application. These messages might indicate the result of some requested processing or initiate some new processing within your application. Advantages of message level integration include the following:
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Message level integration provides loose coupling between your application and remote systems. Message creation and message processing are completely separate from one another, and may occur at different times. Your application and the remote system only need to agree on the format and meaning of the messages. Message level integration maximizes performance. Your application does not have to wait for remote processing to complete before continuing on. Message level integration is scalable. Using message-oriented middleware (such as a JMS provider), messages can be rerouted on the fly as resources dictate. Also, the messaging middleware can provide guaranteed delivery of messages, removing some failure-handling burden from your integration components.
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Message level integration is flexible. The implementation code that generates the message can be modified without altering the code that processes the message, and vice versa. Message level integration only supports the asynchronous interaction model, by definition. This pattern may require adapter code to be written at the remote system. Some systems natively support a set of known message types and a deliver y mechanism that can be extended to accommodate your requirements. In other situations, you may have to write code that receives messages on behalf of the remote system and interacts with it in some other way.
Disadvantages of message level integration include the following:
JMS makes implementing message level integration easy. To implement outbound messaging, you simply publish a message to a JMS topic or queue. This can be done from within an EJB or a dependent object. Consider using the Business Delegate pattern from chapter 2 to separate the messaging code from your EJB . Inbound messaging is even easier. Simply implement a Message Driven EJB to process messages arriving on a specific JMS queue. Procedure level integration This pattern is an extension of message level integration that supports synchronous interaction between systems. This is nothing more than a coordinated pair of messages, a client/server request and reply. Many enterprise systems support this pattern, referring to it as either remote procedure calls (RPC) or remote function calls (RFC). This interaction type is depicted in figure 4.4.
RPC call (Request)
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Remote System
Procedure level integration
Integrating J2EE applications
Advantages of procedure level integration include the following: Procedure level integration supports synchronous interaction as an extension of the message level integration model. This is often an essential requirement in real-time distributed systems. Disadvantages of procedure level integration include the following:
Procedure level integration slows application performance, since your application must wait for remote processing to complete before continuing. Procedure level integration adds a great deal of complexity to the failure model between systems. Your application must determine how remote failures are detected and handled, perhaps including logic to timeout requests and retry them.
Procedure level integration can be complex, and therefore should be encapsulated by a Business Delegate or other dependent object. If remote system resources are constrained, you should also consider pooling a fixed number of delegate objects within each EJB container being used. In this way, you can predict the maximum number of concurrent connections being made to the remote system. The delegate object might also contain logic to rollback its remote changes when used in a transactional EJB context. Connection details, object pool size, and other configuration parameters should be kept in the deployment descriptor of the EJB using the delegate.
Object level integration Object level integration is a specialized integration pattern. It can be used between systems that support a common distributed object architecture, such as CORBA or DCOM. In this pattern, some well-known object acts as an intermediary between client and server software object. This intermediary (the ORB in CORBA ) provides a set of services that clients can use to locate a desired server and invoke it. The general case for object integration is depicted in figure 4.5. Once the client has located the service, the server object provides a remote stub of itself to the client that it can use locally. The stub code translates local method calls into remote ones. On the server side, there is a client skeleton providing the same proxy functionality to the server object. This is depicted in figure 4.6. Advantages of object level integration include the following:
This type of interaction permits object-oriented access to remote applications. This is most useful when the application itself is distributed, since the object models of independent systems may not be completely compatible.
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